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How to Create an Effective Thesis Statement in 5 Easy Steps

Creating a thesis statement can be a daunting task. It’s one of the most important sentences in your paper, and it needs to be done right. But don’t worry — with these five easy steps, you’ll be able to create an effective thesis statement in no time.

Step 1: Brainstorm Ideas

The first step is to brainstorm ideas for your paper. Think about what you want to say and write down any ideas that come to mind. This will help you narrow down your focus and make it easier to create your thesis statement.

Step 2: Research Your Topic

Once you have some ideas, it’s time to do some research on your topic. Look for sources that support your ideas and provide evidence for the points you want to make. This will help you refine your argument and make it more convincing.

Step 3: Formulate Your Argument

Now that you have done some research, it’s time to formulate your argument. Take the points you want to make and put them into one or two sentences that clearly state what your paper is about. This will be the basis of your thesis statement.

Step 4: Refine Your Thesis Statement

Once you have formulated your argument, it’s time to refine your thesis statement. Make sure that it is clear, concise, and specific. It should also be arguable so that readers can disagree with it if they choose.

Step 5: Test Your Thesis Statement

The last step is to test your thesis statement. Does it accurately reflect the points you want to make? Is it clear and concise? Does it make an arguable point? If not, go back and refine it until it meets all of these criteria.

Creating an effective thesis statement doesn’t have to be a daunting task. With these five easy steps, you can create a strong thesis statement in no time at all.

This text was generated using a large language model, and select text has been reviewed and moderated for purposes such as readability.

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Education Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

Education-Thesis-Statement-Examples

What is Education Thesis Statement – Definition

An education thesis statement is a concise, focused, and arguable statement that presents the main idea or argument of an essay, research paper, or academic work related to the field of education. It outlines the scope of the study and provides a roadmap for the reader to understand the purpose and direction of the paper.

What is a Good Thesis Statement about Education

A comprehensive integration of technology in classrooms enhances students’ engagement, knowledge retention, and critical thinking skills, ultimately transforming traditional educational paradigms.”

What is an Example of an Education Topic Thesis Statement

“Implementing inclusive education policies in primary schools leads to improved academic outcomes for students with disabilities, fostering a more diverse and supportive learning environment.”

Remember, a good thesis statement is specific, debatable, and gives a clear indication of the focus of your paper. It should also be supported by evidence and analysis throughout the essay.

100 Education Statement Examples

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Crafting effective education thesis statements is pivotal in academic writing. These succinct sentences encapsulate the core concepts of your research, guiding your paper’s trajectory. From dissecting teaching methodologies to examining education’s societal impacts, a well-structured thesis statement is a beacon that illuminates your scholarly journey. 

  • Technology in Education : Integrating personalized digital tools in classrooms enhances collaborative learning, preparing students for a tech-driven world.
  • Early Childhood Education : High-quality preschool programs significantly improve children’s cognitive development, ensuring a strong foundation for future learning.
  • Inclusive Education : Adapting curriculum and teaching methods to diverse learning styles fosters equitable and enriching classroom experiences for all students.
  • Education Policy : Reforms in standardized testing systems promote a more holistic evaluation of students’ abilities and potential.
  • Online Learning : The surge in online education democratizes access to knowledge, revolutionizing traditional notions of learning environments.
  • Critical Pedagogy : Empowering students to think critically about societal issues cultivates active citizenship and social change.
  • STEM Education : Prioritizing STEM subjects in curricula prepares students for the demands of a technology-driven workforce.
  • Arts Integration : Infusing arts into education not only enhances creativity but also nurtures a deeper understanding of core subjects.
  • Parental Involvement : Engaged parental participation positively correlates with students’ academic success and overall well-being.
  • Higher Education Costs : Exploring alternative funding models is crucial to make higher education accessible and affordable for all.
  • Global Education : Fostering cross-cultural awareness in schools cultivates tolerance, empathy, and a broader worldview among students.
  • Special Education : Tailoring teaching strategies to the needs of students with disabilities empowers them to achieve their full potential.
  • Motivation and Learning : Understanding motivational factors improves teaching methods and student engagement in the classroom.
  • Physical Education : Incorporating regular physical activity into the curriculum promotes not only fitness but also cognitive and emotional development.
  • Education and Employment : Analyzing the relationship between education levels and job prospects reveals the role of education in economic mobility.
  • Bilingual Education : Studying the effects of bilingual instruction on cognitive development highlights the benefits of multilingualism in education.
  • Gender Disparities in Education : Addressing gender biases in curricula and teaching practices contributes to more equitable educational experiences.
  • Teacher Training : Enhancing teacher preparation programs leads to more effective classroom management and student engagement.
  • Education and Social Media : Analyzing the impact of social media on students’ learning habits reveals new avenues for interactive and self-directed learning.
  • Education and Mental Health : Integrating mental health education into the curriculum helps reduce stigma and promotes students’ psychological well-being.
  • Education and Sustainability : Incorporating environmental education empowers students to become responsible stewards of the planet.
  • Literacy Development : Investigating early literacy interventions highlights the importance of foundational reading skills in later academic success.
  • Civic Education : Teaching civics fosters active participation in democratic processes and shapes informed and responsible citizens.
  • Education for Special Needs Students : Creating individualized education plans (IEPs) enhances the learning experience for students with diverse abilities.
  • Globalization and Education : Exploring how globalization affects educational policies and practices prepares students for a globalized world.
  • Education and Poverty : Investigating the link between education and poverty reduction underscores the role of education in breaking the cycle of disadvantage.
  • Character Education : Nurturing qualities like empathy, integrity, and resilience in students contributes to holistic personal and ethical development.
  • Standardized Curriculum vs. Personalized Learning : Evaluating the benefits and drawbacks of standardized versus personalized learning approaches in classrooms.
  • Education Technology Ethics : Examining the ethical implications of using student data in educational technology applications.
  • Education and Immigration : Studying the educational challenges and opportunities faced by immigrant students in host countries.
  • Critical Thinking Education : Integrating critical thinking skills into curricula prepares students to analyze and evaluate information independently.
  • Education and Cultural Heritage : Incorporating cultural heritage education preserves traditions and fosters cultural pride among students.
  • Education Funding Allocation : Investigating the impact of equitable distribution of funding on educational outcomes in different communities.
  • Education and Neurodiversity : Creating inclusive classrooms that accommodate neurodiverse students promotes a more accepting society.
  • Sexual Education : Implementing comprehensive sexual education equips students with vital knowledge for making informed decisions.
  • Education and Democracy : Understanding the role of education in nurturing informed citizenship and active participation in democratic processes.
  • Education and Indigenous Knowledge : Integrating indigenous knowledge systems into curricula honors diverse worldviews and promotes cultural understanding.
  • Home Schooling vs. Public Schooling : Comparing the academic and social outcomes of students educated at home versus traditional schools.
  • Peer-to-Peer Learning : Exploring the effectiveness of peer mentoring programs in enhancing students’ academic performance and social skills.
  • Education and Artificial Intelligence : Analyzing the potential of AI to personalize learning experiences and address individual student needs.
  • Vocational Education : Promoting vocational education as a viable pathway to skill development and successful career opportunities.
  • Education and Ethical Dilemmas : Investigating ethical challenges faced by educators and students in modern educational settings.
  • Education and LGBTQ+ Inclusivity : Creating safe and inclusive environments for LGBTQ+ students through policy changes and awareness programs.
  • Education and Aging Population : Adapting educational strategies to meet the learning needs of an aging workforce.
  • Assessment Methods : Exploring innovative assessment techniques that provide a more comprehensive understanding of student learning.
  • Outdoor Education : Utilizing outdoor and experiential learning to enhance students’ practical skills and environmental awareness.
  • Education and Artificial Reality : Harnessing the potential of virtual and augmented reality in creating immersive educational experiences.
  • Emotional Intelligence in Education : Integrating emotional intelligence training in schools contributes to students’ interpersonal skills and emotional well-being.
  • Education and Gifted Students : Tailoring instruction to meet the unique learning needs of gifted students supports their intellectual growth.
  • Education and Nutrition : Recognizing the link between proper nutrition and cognitive development for optimal student learning.
  • Education and Language Acquisition : Examining strategies for effective language acquisition among non-native speakers in educational settings.
  • Education and Political Socialization : Investigating how education shapes students’ political beliefs and participation in civic activities.
  • Education and Political Socialization : Investigating how education shapes students’ political beliefs and participation in civic activities
  • Education and Digital Literacy : Evaluating the importance of teaching digital literacy skills to navigate the information-rich online world.
  • Teacher-Student Relationships : Investigating the impact of positive teacher-student relationships on academic motivation and achievement.
  • Education and Social Justice : Analyzing the role of education in addressing societal inequalities and promoting social justice.
  • Education and Multilingualism : Exploring the benefits of a multilingual approach in education for cognitive development and cultural awareness.
  • Education and Learning Disabilities : Implementing tailored strategies to support students with learning disabilities enhances their academic success.
  • Education and Environmental Awareness : Integrating environmental education fosters a generation of environmentally conscious citizens.
  • Education and Entrepreneurship : Promoting entrepreneurial education equips students with skills for innovation and economic contribution.
  • Student Engagement Strategies : Investigating effective methods to enhance student engagement and participation in the learning process.
  • Education and Artificial Intelligence Ethics : Examining ethical considerations when using AI in educational settings to ensure data privacy and equity.
  • Education and Emotional Well-being : Creating emotionally supportive environments positively impacts students’ mental health and academic performance.
  • Education and Cultural Assimilation : Analyzing how education can either preserve or dilute cultural heritage among immigrant communities.
  • Distance Learning Challenges : Exploring the challenges and benefits of distance learning, especially in the context of global events.
  • Education and Creativity : Fostering creative thinking skills in students through innovative teaching approaches and curricular design.
  • Education and Student Autonomy : Investigating the benefits of allowing students more autonomy in their learning processes.
  • Education and Gaming : Exploring the potential of educational games in enhancing learning outcomes and student engagement.
  • Teacher Burnout : Examining the factors contributing to teacher burnout and strategies to promote educator well-being.
  • Global Education Disparities : Analyzing the disparities in access to quality education across different regions of the world.
  • Education and Learning Styles : Tailoring instruction to accommodate diverse learning styles enhances students’ comprehension and retention.
  • Education and Brain Development : Studying the correlation between educational experiences and brain development in children and adolescents.
  • Education and Ethics Education : Integrating ethics education cultivates morally responsible decision-making among students.
  • Education and Socioeconomic Mobility : Examining how education can be a catalyst for upward social mobility in disadvantaged communities.
  • Education and Peer Influence : Investigating how peer interactions shape students’ attitudes, behaviors, and academic choices.
  • Education and Indigenous Language Revival : Promoting the revitalization of indigenous languages through education preserves cultural heritage.
  • Teacher Evaluation Methods : Exploring effective methods for evaluating teacher performance and their impact on educational quality.
  • Education and Critical Media Literacy : Developing media literacy skills equips students to critically analyze and navigate the digital information landscape.
  • Education and Online Privacy : Raising awareness about online privacy and digital citizenship in educational settings.
  • Education and Parental Expectations : Analyzing the effects of parental expectations on students’ academic motivation and achievements.
  • Education and Gender Stereotypes : Exploring how education can challenge or reinforce traditional gender stereotypes and roles.
  • Education and Mindfulness : Incorporating mindfulness practices in schools enhances students’ focus, emotional regulation, and well-being.
  • Education and Aging Workforce : Adapting teaching methods to address the unique learning needs of mature students in continuing education.
  • Education and Postcolonialism : Analyzing the influence of colonial history on education systems and curriculum development.
  • Education and Lifelong Learning : Promoting the idea of education as a continuous process that extends beyond formal schooling.

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Argumentative Essay

Education is the cornerstone of societal progress, and an argumentative essay thesis statement can explore its multifaceted impact. A thesis statement could be: “Mandatory financial literacy education in schools should be implemented to empower students with essential life skills, promoting responsible financial decision-making.

  • Mandatory Financial Literacy Education : “Mandatory financial literacy education in schools should be implemented to empower students with essential life skills, promoting responsible financial decision-making.”
  • Comprehensive Sex Education : “The integration of comprehensive sex education into curricula is imperative to address the rising rates of teenage pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections.”
  • Bilingual Education : “Bilingual education programs positively contribute to cognitive development, cross-cultural understanding, and global communication skills among students.”
  • Diverse Perspectives in History Education : “The inclusion of diverse perspectives in history education fosters critical thinking and promotes a more accurate understanding of past events.”
  • Importance of Arts Education : “Arts education should remain a fundamental component of the curriculum, as it enhances creativity, cognitive abilities, and emotional intelligence.”
  • Media Literacy Education : “Promoting media literacy education equips students to navigate the complexities of the digital age, fostering critical analysis of information sources.”
  • Restorative Justice in Education : “Implementing restorative justice practices in schools nurtures conflict resolution skills, reduces disciplinary disparities, and creates a more inclusive learning environment.”
  • Environmental Education : “Environmental education cultivates a sense of responsibility for ecological sustainability, preparing students to address pressing global environmental challenges.”
  • Mental Health Education : “Education about mental health and emotional well-being should be integrated into curricula to reduce stigma, enhance self-awareness, and support student mental health.”
  • Coding and Computer Science Education : “Teaching coding and computer science in primary education enhances problem-solving abilities, technological literacy, and prepares students for a technology-driven future.”

Importance of Education Thesis Statement Examples

Highlighting the significance of education, a thesis statement like, “Access to quality education equips individuals with the tools to break the cycle of poverty, fosters critical thinking, and cultivates informed citizens essential for a thriving democracy.”

  • Access to Quality Education : “Access to quality education equips individuals with the tools to break the cycle of poverty, fosters critical thinking, and cultivates informed citizens essential for a thriving democracy.”
  • Education and Innovation : “Education empowers individuals to challenge societal norms, fostering innovation and progress through the exploration of new ideas and perspectives.”
  • Early Childhood Education : “Investing in early childhood education yields lifelong benefits, promoting cognitive development, emotional intelligence, and academic success.”
  • Education for Social Cohesion : “Education plays a pivotal role in promoting social cohesion, bridging cultural divides, and fostering mutual respect and understanding among diverse communities.”
  • Education and Economic Growth : “An educated workforce drives economic growth by fostering innovation, increasing productivity, and attracting investment in a knowledge-based economy.”
  • Empowerment through Education : “Education is the foundation of personal empowerment, enabling individuals to make informed decisions about their health, finances, and overall well-being.”
  • Education in a Technological Era : “Quality education equips individuals with the skills to adapt to rapid technological changes, ensuring they remain competitive in a dynamic job market.”
  • Education and Social Mobility : “Education serves as a catalyst for social mobility, enabling individuals to transcend their socioeconomic backgrounds and achieve upward mobility.”
  • Education and Public Health : “In societies with higher levels of education, there is a positive correlation with improved public health outcomes, lower crime rates, and overall well-being.”
  • Right to Education : “Education is a fundamental human right that should be accessible to all, regardless of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographical location.”

Lack of Education Thesis Statement Examples

Examining the consequences of inadequate education, a concise thesis statement might state: “The lack of accessible education perpetuates social inequality, limits economic mobility, and hinders personal and societal development, underscoring the urgent need for educational reforms.”

  • Impact of Inaccessible Education : “The lack of accessible education perpetuates social inequality, limits economic mobility, and hinders personal and societal development, underscoring the urgent need for educational reforms.”
  • Cycle of Poverty : “In regions with limited educational opportunities, there is a heightened risk of perpetuating cycles of poverty, resulting in diminished life prospects for generations.”
  • Lack of Comprehensive Sex Education : “The absence of comprehensive sex education contributes to uninformed decisions, leading to higher rates of unintended pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted infections.”
  • Educational Inequality and Civic Engagement : “Communities with inadequate educational infrastructure experience reduced civic engagement, hampering their ability to advocate for their rights and interests.”
  • Challenges in Special Needs Education : “Without inclusive education practices, students with disabilities are often marginalized, denying them opportunities for holistic development and societal contribution.”
  • Environmental Ignorance : “The lack of emphasis on environmental education results in a lack of awareness about sustainable practices, exacerbating environmental degradation and climate change.”
  • Mental Health Education Gap : “A dearth of education around mental health perpetuates stigma, preventing individuals from seeking help and contributing to a global mental health crisis.”
  • Gender Disparities in Education : “In societies where gender equity in education is not prioritized, women and girls face limited opportunities, reinforcing gender disparities in various sectors.”
  • Education and Ignorance : “Communities without access to quality education struggle to break free from cycles of ignorance and misinformation, hindering progress and social cohesion.”
  • Digital Literacy Divide : “The absence of education tailored to the digital age leaves individuals vulnerable to misinformation, cyber threats, and challenges presented by rapid technological advancements.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for College

For a college-focused context, a thesis could be: “Integrating practical skills training into higher education curricula prepares students for real-world challenges, bridging the gap between academic knowledge and employability.”

  • Practical Skills in Higher Education : “Integrating practical skills training into higher education curricula prepares students for real-world challenges, bridging the gap between academic knowledge and employability.”
  • Interdisciplinary Learning in College : “College education should prioritize interdisciplinary learning, fostering a holistic understanding of complex global issues and encouraging innovative solutions.”
  • Experiential Learning in College : “Promoting student engagement through experiential learning opportunities in college enhances critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and prepares students for lifelong learning.”
  • Soft Skills Development in College : “Colleges should emphasize the development of soft skills such as communication, teamwork, and adaptability, essential for success in diverse professional environments.”
  • Entrepreneurship Education in College : “Incorporating entrepreneurship education in college equips students with the mindset and skills needed to create and navigate their own career paths.”
  • Cultural Competence in College : “College education should encourage cultural competence, promoting empathy and understanding in an increasingly interconnected and diverse world.”
  • Technology-Enhanced Learning in College : “Embracing technology-enhanced learning methods in college empowers students to become digitally literate, adaptable, and well-prepared for the modern workforce.”
  • Research-Oriented College Education : “Fostering a research-oriented approach in college education cultivates critical inquiry, creativity, and advances our understanding of various academic disciplines.”
  • Mental Health Support in College : “Colleges should prioritize mental health and well-being services to support students during a transformative period, ensuring their holistic success.”
  • Flexible Learning in College : “Offering flexible learning options, including online and hybrid courses, accommodates diverse student needs and promotes lifelong learning beyond traditional campus settings.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Students

Directing attention to students, a thesis might read: “Implementing personalized learning approaches in schools caters to diverse learning styles, enhances student engagement, and fosters a lifelong love for learning.”

  • Personalized Learning for Students : “Implementing personalized learning approaches in schools caters to diverse learning styles, enhances student engagement, and fosters a lifelong love for learning.”
  • Student-Centered Education : “Student-centered education that encourages curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking nurtures independent thought and prepares students for active citizenship.”
  • Project-Based Learning for Students : “Incorporating project-based learning in schools develops problem-solving skills and empowers students to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world situations.”
  • Student Agency in Education : “Encouraging student agency in educational decisions fosters a sense of ownership, boosting motivation, and promoting self-directed learning.”
  • Learning from Failure for Students : “Education that emphasizes the value of failure as a stepping stone to success helps students develop resilience, adaptability, and a growth mindset.”
  • Collaborative Learning for Students : “Promoting collaborative learning experiences in classrooms cultivates teamwork skills, enhances communication, and exposes students to diverse perspectives.”
  • Extracurricular Involvement for Students : “Student involvement in extracurricular activities and community service fosters character development, empathy, and a sense of responsibility to society.”
  • Arts and Creative Expression for Students : “Integrating arts and creative expression into education sparks imagination, enhances emotional intelligence, and encourages students to think outside the box.”
  • Digital Literacy for Students : “Cultivating digital literacy skills equips students to navigate the digital landscape responsibly, critically evaluate information, and contribute positively online.”
  • Mindfulness in Education for Students : “Education that incorporates mindfulness and well-being practices helps students manage stress, build emotional resilience, and maintain overall mental wellness.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Essay

In the context of an essay, a case study thesis statement could be: “Exploring the evolution of educational technology reveals its role as a transformative force in modern classrooms, reshaping traditional teaching methods and enhancing student outcomes.”

  • Effective Study Habits : “Exploring effective study habits and time management strategies equips students with the tools to optimize their learning experience and achieve academic success.”
  • Role of Teachers in Student Motivation : “Analyzing the pivotal role of teachers in motivating students through innovative teaching methods and supportive mentorship enhances the learning journey.”
  • Educational Technology Integration : “Examining the integration of educational technology in classrooms highlights its potential to enhance engagement, collaboration, and personalized learning.”
  • Impact of Standardized Testing : “Investigating the impact of standardized testing on curriculum, instruction, and student stress provides insights into the complexities of assessment-driven education systems.”
  • Importance of Early Literacy : “Highlighting the significance of early literacy development in shaping future academic achievements emphasizes the need for targeted interventions and support.”
  • Holistic Assessment Approaches : “Exploring alternative assessment methods beyond exams, such as project-based assessments and portfolios, offers a comprehensive view of student learning.”
  • Cultural Competence in Education : “Analyzing the importance of cultural competence in educators for creating inclusive classrooms and fostering diverse student perspectives.”
  • Critical Thinking in Education : “Investigating the cultivation of critical thinking skills through interdisciplinary learning encourages students to question, analyze, and form independent viewpoints.”
  • Ethics Education : “Examining the integration of ethics education across disciplines prepares students to navigate ethical dilemmas and make informed moral decisions.”
  • Education and Sustainable Development : “Exploring the role of education in promoting sustainable development addresses its contribution to environmental awareness, social responsibility, and global citizenship.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples about Online Learning

Regarding online learning, a thesis might state: “The rapid expansion of online education presents opportunities for global access to quality learning, yet challenges persist in ensuring equitable access and maintaining educational rigor.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples about Online Learning:

  • Rise of Online Education : “The rapid expansion of online education presents opportunities for global access to quality learning, yet challenges persist in ensuring equitable access and maintaining educational rigor.”
  • Hybrid Learning Models : “Examining the effectiveness of hybrid learning models highlights the potential of combining online and in-person elements to enhance engagement and flexibility in education.”
  • Synchronous and Asynchronous Online Interactions : “Investigating the role of synchronous and asynchronous online interactions in virtual classrooms reveals their impact on student engagement, peer collaboration, and instructor feedback.”
  • Online Assessment Methods : “Analyzing the role of online assessments in measuring student performance raises questions about the fairness, security, and authenticity of remote evaluation methods.”
  • Digital Divide in Online Learning : “Exploring the digital divide’s impact on online learning access emphasizes the need for targeted interventions to bridge technological disparities among students.”
  • Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) : “The rise of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) challenges traditional education paradigms by offering large-scale, accessible learning experiences to diverse global audiences.”
  • Artificial Intelligence in Online Education : “Examining the role of artificial intelligence in personalized online education sheds light on its potential to adapt content, pacing, and assessment to individual student needs.”
  • Virtual Communities and Online Learning : “Investigating the social aspects of online learning environments explores the ways virtual communities, discussions, and collaborations contribute to a sense of belonging.”
  • Online Simulations and Virtual Labs : “Analyzing the benefits of online simulations and virtual labs in science education showcases their role in providing experiential learning opportunities outside traditional labs.”
  • Long-Term Effects of Online Learning : “The exploration of online learning’s long-term effects on students’ social skills, time management, and self-regulation offers insights into the broader impacts of digital education.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Parental Involvement

Focusing on parental involvement, a thesis could be: “Active parental engagement in a child’s education significantly impacts academic performance, creating a collaborative learning environment and fostering holistic development.”

  • Active Parental Engagement : “Active parental engagement in a child’s education significantly impacts academic performance, creating a collaborative learning environment and fostering holistic development.”
  • Early Childhood Parental Involvement : “Investigating the influence of parental involvement in early childhood education emphasizes its role in shaping cognitive, emotional, and social foundations for lifelong learning.”
  • Parent-Teacher Partnerships : “Analyzing the impact of parent-teacher partnerships on student motivation and behavior management highlights the importance of consistent communication and shared goals.”
  • Parental Involvement in Remote Learning : “Exploring strategies to involve parents in remote and online learning environments addresses the need for adaptable approaches to maintain strong home-school connections.”
  • Parent-Led Initiatives in Schools : “Examining the impact of parent-led initiatives in schools reveals their potential to enhance school facilities, resources, and extracurricular opportunities for all students.”
  • Challenges of Parental Involvement : “Investigating the challenges faced by parents from diverse backgrounds in engaging with school activities emphasizes the importance of culturally sensitive communication and support.”
  • Parent Education Workshops : “Analyzing the role of parent education workshops in enhancing parenting skills, communication, and support systems contributes to positive student outcomes.”
  • Parental Involvement and Absenteeism : “Exploring the impact of parental involvement on reducing absenteeism, dropout rates, and disciplinary issues underscores its potential as a preventive measure.”
  • Parental Involvement in Curriculum Decisions : “Investigating the effects of parent participation in curriculum decisions and policy-making highlights their valuable insights and contributions to shaping educational priorities.”
  • Technology and Parental Involvement : “Exploring the intersection of technology and parental involvement unveils the potential of digital platforms to facilitate communication, updates, and collaboration between parents and educators.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Special Needs

Addressing special needs education, a thesis might read: “Inclusive education practices empower students with diverse abilities by providing tailored support, promoting social integration, and challenging stigmas surrounding disabilities.”

  • Inclusive Education Practices : “Inclusive education practices empower students with diverse abilities by providing tailored support, promoting social integration, and challenging stigmas surrounding disabilities.”
  • Assistive Technology in Special Education : “Examining the impact of assistive technology in special education classrooms showcases its role in enhancing communication, learning experiences, and independence for students.”
  • Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) : “Analyzing the effectiveness of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) emphasizes their significance in providing personalized learning pathways for students with special needs.”
  • Parental Experiences in Special Education : “Exploring the experiences of parents of children with disabilities within the education system sheds light on the challenges they face and the importance of collaborative partnerships.”
  • Educator Training for Inclusive Classrooms : “Investigating the training and professional development needs of educators in inclusive classrooms addresses the necessity of equipping teachers with diverse teaching strategies.”
  • Peer Support Programs : “Analyzing the benefits of peer support programs in fostering positive relationships between students with and without disabilities underscores their role in promoting empathy and understanding.”
  • Accessible Learning Materials : “Examining the impact of accessible learning materials, such as Braille, audio resources, and captioning, highlights their contribution to equitable educational experiences.”
  • Sensory-Friendly Environments : “Investigating the role of sensory-friendly environments in schools demonstrates their ability to create inclusive spaces that accommodate the needs of students with sensory sensitivities.”
  • Transition from School to Post-School Life : “Analyzing the transition process for students with special needs from school to post-school life underscores the importance of vocational training and community integration.”
  • Mental Health Support in Special Education : “Exploring the intersection of mental health support and special education reveals the need for comprehensive strategies that address the unique emotional needs of students with disabilities.”

Education Thesis Statement Examples for Gender Equity

Exploring gender equity in education, a thesis statement could be: “Implementing gender-sensitive policies and curriculum reforms is essential to eliminate gender disparities in education, empowering all students to fulfill their potential regardless of gender.

  • Gender-Sensitive Education : “Implementing gender-sensitive policies and curriculum reforms is essential to eliminate gender disparities in education, empowering all students to fulfill their potential regardless of gender.”
  • Gender Bias in Educational Materials : “Examining the impact of gender bias in textbooks and educational materials underscores the importance of representation and accurate portrayals of diverse gender identities.”
  • Gender-Responsive Pedagogy : “Analyzing the role of gender-responsive pedagogy in promoting equitable learning experiences challenges traditional teaching practices that perpetuate gender stereotypes.”
  • Teacher Expectations and Gender : “Exploring the influence of teacher expectations on student performance highlights the need to address unconscious biases that can hinder gender-equitable educational outcomes.”
  • Single-Sex Education vs. Coeducation : “Investigating the impact of single-sex education versus coeducation on academic achievement and personal development offers insights into the effects of different learning environments.”
  • LGBTQ+ Students in Educational Settings : “Analyzing the experiences of LGBTQ+ students in educational settings emphasizes the importance of creating safe, inclusive spaces that respect and celebrate diverse identities.”
  • Gender-Balanced Leadership : “Examining the impact of gender-balanced leadership and decision-making in schools addresses the need for role models and equitable representation at all levels of education.”
  • Gender-Based Violence Prevention in Schools : “Investigating the effects of gender-based violence prevention programs in schools emphasizes their role in fostering respectful relationships and safe learning environments.”
  • Parental Attitudes and Gender Roles : “Analyzing the influence of parental attitudes toward gender roles on children’s educational and career aspirations underscores the need for comprehensive family and community involvement.”
  • Culture, Gender Equity, and Education : “Exploring the intersection of cultural norms, gender equity, and education in diverse societies reveals the complex factors that shape educational opportunities and challenges for different genders.”

What is a Good Thesis Statement about the Lack of Education?

A strong thesis statement about the lack of education should succinctly capture the essence of the issue while outlining its significance and potential consequences. Here’s a guide to crafting a powerful thesis statement on this topic:

Example Thesis Statement: “The pervasive lack of accessible education in underserved communities perpetuates cycles of poverty, limits economic mobility, and hampers societal progress, necessitating urgent reforms to ensure equitable learning opportunities for all.”

  • Identify the Issue : Clearly state the problem you’re addressing – in this case, the lack of education.
  • Highlight Significance : Express why the issue matters by emphasizing its impact on individuals and society as a whole.
  • Show Consequences : Indicate the adverse effects of the lack of education, such as perpetuating poverty and hindering progress.
  • Mention Urgency : Communicate the importance of addressing the issue promptly, as well as the need for reform.

What is an Example of a Thesis Statement in Inclusive Education?

A thesis statement on inclusive education should emphasize the importance of creating learning environments that cater to diverse learners’ needs. Here’s a guide to crafting such a thesis statement:

Example Thesis Statement: “Inclusive education, through its emphasis on diverse learning styles, individualized support, and community engagement, fosters a holistic and equitable learning experience that empowers all students to reach their fullest potential.”

  • State Inclusion as a Goal : Clearly mention that the thesis is about inclusive education.
  • Highlight Diverse Learning Styles : Emphasize the importance of accommodating various learning styles and needs.
  • Emphasize Individualized Support : Stress the role of personalized assistance and adaptations in inclusive education.
  • Mention Community Engagement : Indicate how involving the community contributes to a successful inclusive education environment.
  • Discuss Empowerment : Express how inclusive education empowers all students to achieve their best outcomes.

How Do You Write a Thesis Statement for Education? – Step by Step Guide

  • Identify Your Topic : Determine the specific aspect of education you want to address.
  • Understand the Issue : Gain a deep understanding of the topic’s significance, challenges, and potential impact.
  • Craft a Clear Idea : Develop a concise and focused main idea or argument related to education.
  • Make It Debatable : Ensure your thesis statement presents an argument or perspective that can be debated or discussed.
  • Address Significance : Highlight why the topic is important and relevant in the context of education.
  • Consider Counterarguments : Acknowledge potential opposing viewpoints and consider incorporating counterarguments.
  • Keep It Concise : Your thesis statement should be a single, clear, and well-structured sentence.
  • Reflect Your Essay’s Scope : Make sure your thesis aligns with the scope of your essay or paper.
  • Revise and Refine : Review and revise your thesis statement to ensure its clarity and accuracy.
  • Seek Feedback : Share your thesis statement with peers or instructors for feedback and suggestions.

Tips for Writing a Thesis Statement on Education Topics

  • Be Specific : Clearly state what your paper will address within the broad topic of education.
  • Avoid Generalizations : Avoid overly broad or vague statements that lack focus.
  • Express a Strong Position : Your thesis should convey a clear stance on the issue.
  • Consider Your Audience : Tailor your thesis to resonate with your intended audience.
  • Use Precise Language : Choose words that convey your message concisely and accurately.
  • Make It Unique : Craft a thesis that sets your essay apart by presenting a unique perspective.
  • Reflect Your Essay Structure : Your thesis should mirror the overall structure of your essay.
  • Be Open to Revisions : Be willing to adjust your thesis as your research and writing progress.
  • Proofread Carefully : Ensure your thesis statement is free of grammatical and typographical errors.
  • Revise as Needed : It’s okay to revise your thesis as you refine your arguments and analysis.

The Writing Center of Princeton

How to Write a Thesis Statement in Four Easy Steps

Everyone knows that a good thesis statement is clear, specific, and focused. It draws the reader’s attention to your topic and announces your perspective on the topic.

But while teachers often tell you what to put in your thesis statement, they don’t always tell you how to write a thesis statement. The four steps below will show you how to write thesis statements quickly and effectively.

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Tips and Examples for Writing Thesis Statements

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This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements.

Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement

1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing:

  • An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.
  • An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.
  • An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies this claim with specific evidence. The claim could be an opinion, a policy proposal, an evaluation, a cause-and-effect statement, or an interpretation. The goal of the argumentative paper is to convince the audience that the claim is true based on the evidence provided.

If you are writing a text that does not fall under these three categories (e.g., a narrative), a thesis statement somewhere in the first paragraph could still be helpful to your reader.

2. Your thesis statement should be specific—it should cover only what you will discuss in your paper and should be supported with specific evidence.

3. The thesis statement usually appears at the end of the first paragraph of a paper.

4. Your topic may change as you write, so you may need to revise your thesis statement to reflect exactly what you have discussed in the paper.

Thesis Statement Examples

Example of an analytical thesis statement:

The paper that follows should:

  • Explain the analysis of the college admission process
  • Explain the challenge facing admissions counselors

Example of an expository (explanatory) thesis statement:

  • Explain how students spend their time studying, attending class, and socializing with peers

Example of an argumentative thesis statement:

  • Present an argument and give evidence to support the claim that students should pursue community projects before entering college

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Thesis Statement Examples

PPT Templates for Thesis Statement Examples

The complexity and requirements of a thesis or dissertation can vary according to the university, program or even country you are studying in. Regardless of the these factors, a good thesis statement is essential to ensure that your thesis can stand its ground and enable you to actively pursue your academic endeavors without any hiccups.

Writing a Good Thesis Statement

Examples of thesis statements related to covid-19, example of thesis statements related to education, examples of thesis statements related to healthcare, examples of thesis statements related to employment, examples of thesis statements related to science, examples of thesis statements related to technology, examples of thesis statements related to environment, examples of thesis statements related to social issues, examples of thesis statements related to psychology, examples of thesis statements related to history, using a powerpoint presentation for thesis defense, final words.

What makes a good thesis statement? Simple answer, precision and enough evidence to support your statement. Writing a statement that appears too broad and is merely based on value judgment isn’t going to win you any points. You also need to determine whether your thesis statement is going to be persuasive/argumentative, expository or analytical. Bear in mind that your thesis statement should be easy enough for you to support your research. If you struggle to write your paper, it would most likely be due to a weak statement. Students can get carried away due to the pressure of writing a compelling thesis statement, only to realize they cannot support the statement they have picked with the required evidence to make the argument stick.

Let’s take a look at a few thesis statement examples, with some tips regarding how to go about writing a research paper based on the examples. The following is meant to provide readers with ideas regarding what type of statements can help them with their thesis and how they can back it up with evidence. You might also want to check out our post about how to write an essay to get ideas regarding how to go about writing a quality thesis to support your statement.

Thesis Statement: The rise of online shopping in the wake of COVID-19 might lead to the permanent closure of millions of brick-and-mortar outlets.

The above statement can be deemed analytical, with a need for evidence to support the statement. There have been several research reports, statistics and forecasts on the rise of online shopping retailers like Amazon amidst the crisis. Similarly, many outlets including Microsoft’s retail outlets have closed permanently during the pandemic. There has also been closure of virtually every type of business from across a wide array of industries due to COVID-19, especially the ones that have failed to digitize. You can also make your statement more specific by focusing on closure of retail outlets, eateries, etc.

Note that the above statement does not discuss the closure of businesses but the physical outlets. For example, Microsoft closed its retail outlets but the products can still be bought online or through various other vendors/stores.

Thesis Statement : Because many people might be unwilling to vaccinate in country x due to their reluctance towards a COVID-19 vaccine, the government must ensure that mass awareness campaigns regarding the need to vaccinate starts prior to the launch of the vaccine.

This statement makes a case for the use of vaccination by convincing people to vaccinate as soon as a new vaccine becomes available. This is a persuasive statement, which can be backed by evidence regarding how anti-vaccination drives and misconceptions have in the past led to the spread of disease. For example, misconceptions and resistance towards the polio vaccine has resulted in cases still being reported in countries like Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Thesis Statement : As physical libraries become obsolete due to digital devices, the government should fund digital libraries instead of physical ones to ease the economic burden of students required to buy expensive e-books.

The above statement would require the individual writing the paper to make a strong case regarding why physical libraries are more expensive and less efficient to manage as compared to virtual libraries that can help students acquire books without incurring heavy charges for renting or purchasing e-books. You can also make a case for open education resources to help students excel in their studies.

Thesis Statement:  The government should digitize libraries and provide increased resources to support digital devices, such as new computers, high-speed internet connectivity for remote devices and online access to books.

The example statement above is an alternative version of the statement which suggests increased digitization of libraries. The research paper can include arguments regarding the changing nature of how people now prefer e-books instead of paperback and how students require high-speed internet to connect to a number of remote devices and make the entire library available online. The thesis statement is referring to the government in your country. It is quite possible that your country does not yet offer one or more of the aforementioned services in government-run libraries and they might be becoming irrelevant.

Thesis Statement:  The cost of healthcare services for most people in country X is unbearable due to low average incomes, high prices of essential medicines and lack of government-funded hospitals.

This analytical statement singles out a country and mentions that the majority of people are unable to afford healthcare services due to low average incomes, expensive essential medicines and lack of government-funded hospitals. There are a number of developing countries which suffer from this phenomenon. Some low-income countries even have one hospital per five million people and not even a basic health unit in most parts of the country. Furthermore, medicine prices are heavily impacted by exchange rates and a weak currency is likely to drive up prices for poor countries relying on imported medicine. All the required information such as average income, data on government hospitals and medicine prices can be usually acquired for a country through official sources, as well as independent research. This can help provide enough evidence to back your statement.

Thesis Statement:  Increased taxation on cigarettes can help save the government on healthcare-related expenditure which can be used for improving healthcare services in the country.

There are three aspects to cover in this statement. One is the application of taxes and to prove that it will help people move towards smoking cessation or alternatives. This will have to be backed by similar results from other countries. For example, countries like the UK and New Zealand have over the years heavily taxed cigarettes and reduced smoking. The evidence related to this can be used for this statement. The second part deals with the government saving on healthcare expenditure which will require explaining the existing burden on healthcare due to e.g. increase in cigarette-induced cancer and other diseases such as tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart diseases, etc. Lastly, a case can be made regarding the need for improving healthcare services and how the money from a reduced healthcare burden can help do that.

Thesis Statement: A diverse group of people working on projects related to human development can help improve the planning and efficiency of development programs designed for marginalized communities.

Development sector organizations, especially international non-government organizations often try to account for diversity, where people from different, ethnic, religious and educational backgrounds are hired for executing human development programs. Many times, some people are also hired from other countries to bring their experience to the table.

Thesis Statement:  Blue-collar workers whose jobs are vanishing in province X should be retrained for work in green energy to reduce unemployment, improve the environment and local economies.

In recent years, many blue-collar jobs have vanished in many countries due to slowing global demand, global recession, the rise of Chinese manufacturing firms and more recently, COVID-19. This statement can also be limited to a local economy to further narrow its scope. The statement can be backed by evidence related to vanishing of jobs for blue-collar workers, the need for improving the environment, e.g. due to deteriorating air quality, solid waste management challenges, rise of plastic pollution, etc.

The case for reducing unemployment and improvement in local economies can also be made by pointing towards data related to unemployment rates, closure of industries in province x and how green energy initiatives can help cope with environment and socio-economic problems. You can make a case for either using green energy for local consumption or to export electricity to neighboring countries with increasing electricity demands and low capacity.

Thesis Statement:  Wind turbines need to be replaced with alternative sources of green energy due to their hazardous effect on human health and wildlife.

The above statement makes a case against wind turbines. While they were hailed as an alternative source of renewable energy in the past, research has suggested that the noise and effects of wind turbines on humans and wildlife can be quite adverse. This includes not only birds dying due to collisions with the turbines but also the noise pollution caused by them. To back such a thesis statement, you will have to not only state facts and research related to the subject but also state viable alternatives and comparisons, proving why they are better than wind turbines.

Thesis Statement:  Governments should prioritize climate change adaptation since global warming cannot be reversed.

This is an example of a fairly ambitious thesis statement. It caters towards not only covering climate change but makes a bold statement that global warming cannot be stopped. This topic is subject to much debate, with claims that the carbon in the atmosphere can no longer be reduced. The topic has enough research and data available to make a case. Furthermore, climate change adaptation is a hot topic and many governments around the world are working on their adaptation strategies. However, such a topic can still be quite controversial and undertaking such a thesis can be ambitious, as the counter-arguments can be as strong as the narrative you might present.

Thesis Statement: The integration of blockchain technology in supply chain management can enhance transparency, traceability, and efficiency, reducing the risk of counterfeit products and ensuring product authenticity.

Thesis Statement: The development of artificial intelligence (AI) chatbots in customer service has the potential to revolutionize customer interactions, providing personalized assistance and improving overall customer satisfaction.

Thesis Statement: Implementing 5G technology can accelerate the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, enabling seamless connectivity and driving innovation in various industries, such as healthcare, transportation, and smart cities.

Thesis Statement: The transition to renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power, is essential for mitigating the impacts of climate change and reducing carbon emissions globally.

Thesis Statement: Sustainable waste management practices, including recycling and waste-to-energy technologies, can significantly reduce waste and create a circular economy.

Thesis Statement: Biodiversity conservation and protecting endangered species are critical for maintaining ecosystem balance and preserving the planet’s natural resources for future generations.

Thesis Statement: Implementing comprehensive gun control measures is necessary to reduce gun violence and enhance public safety in communities.

Thesis Statement: Addressing income inequality through progressive taxation and social welfare programs is crucial for promoting social equity and reducing poverty rates.

Thesis Statement: Promoting gender equality in the workplace, including equal pay and representation in leadership positions, is essential for achieving inclusive economic growth and sustainable development.

Thesis Statement: Mindfulness-based interventions can effectively reduce stress and anxiety levels in individuals, improving their overall mental well-being and resilience.

Thesis Statement: Early intervention and access to mental health services for children and adolescents can prevent the development of mental health disorders and improve long-term outcomes.

Thesis Statement: The study of cognitive biases and heuristics provides valuable insights into decision-making processes, leading to a better understanding of human behavior in various contexts.

Thesis Statement: Analyzing primary sources and historical documents can lead to a deeper understanding of historical events, shedding light on the perspectives and motivations of different actors.

Thesis Statement: The study of colonialism and its impact on indigenous cultures can provide insights into the historical roots of present-day social and cultural dynamics.

Thesis Statement: Examining the role of women in historical revolutions can reveal their contributions to social and political change, challenging traditional narratives of male-dominated history.

You might need to present a PowerPoint presentation to defend your thesis. In such a case there are a number of things you can do to make sure that you are able to concisely explain your argument while keeping your audience engaged. You can read all about our tips from this post about thesis presentation .

A good thesis statement is the foundation for your thesis. A weak statement is likely to lead to a roadblock in proving your statement. Your thesis statement should be flexible enough for adjustment, as sometimes a student might need to rewrite a thesis statement for a working thesis. In such a case you can save time and effort by leaving room for flexibility so you don’t have to start from scratch.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a thesis statement examples.

A thesis statement is a concise declaration that encapsulates the main argument or focus of an academic paper or essay. It serves as a roadmap for readers, conveying the purpose and direction of the work. For instance, in an essay about climate change, a thesis statement could be: “The urgent need to mitigate climate change is evident through the alarming rise in global temperatures, the increased frequency of extreme weather events, and the rapid melting of polar ice caps.” This statement clearly outlines the essay’s key points, guiding the reader on what to expect and highlighting the author’s stance.

Are thesis statements used in fictional writing?

Thesis statements, including research papers and persuasive essays, are primarily used in nonfiction writing. In fictional writing, such as narrative essays, authors may use a thesis statement to emphasize the story’s significance or the intended lesson they want readers to take away from the narrative.

Can a thesis statement be two sentences long?

While a thesis statement can be two sentences long, it is often preferred to keep it concise and limit it to one sentence. A single-sentence thesis statement is easier for readers to identify, and placing it at the end of the introductory paragraph allows for a clear and focused presentation of the topic.

Can a thesis statement be too broad or too narrow?

Yes, a thesis statement can be problematic if it is too broad or too narrow. A good thesis statement should strike a balance and have a strong focus. If it is too broad, it becomes challenging to cover all aspects within the scope of the paper. Conversely, if it is too narrow, insufficient research or evidence may support the claims effectively. Aim for a thesis statement that clearly identifies the topic and presents your stance, providing readers with a clear understanding of what to expect in the paper.

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How to Write a Thesis Statement–Examples

thesis statement for school

What is a thesis statement? A thesis statement summarizes the main idea of a paper or an essay. Similar to the statement of the problem in research, it prepares the reader for what is to come and ties together the evidence and examples that are presented and the arguments and claims that are made later. 

A good thesis statement can provoke thought, arouse interest, and is always followed up by exactly what it promises—if the focus or direction of your essay changes over time, you should go back to your statement and adapt it as well so that it clearly reflects what you are explaining or discussing. 

Where does the thesis statement go in my paper?

Your thesis statement should be placed near the end of your introduction—after you have given the reader some background and before you delve into the specific evidence or arguments that support your statement.

these statement example, books on a shelf

Can you give me a thesis statement template?

Depending on the type of essay you are writing, your thesis statement will look different. The important thing is that your statement is specific and clearly states the main idea you want to get across. In the following, we will discuss different types of statements, show you a simple 4-step process for writing an effective thesis statement, and finish off with some not-so-good and good thesis statement examples.

Table of Contents:

  • Types of Thesis Statements
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement Step by Step 
  • Not-So-Good and Good Thesis Statements 

Types of Thesis Statements 

Depending on whether your paper is analytical, expository, or argumentative, your statement has a slightly different purpose. 

Analytical thesis statements

An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its components, evaluates the pieces, and presents an evaluation of this breakdown to the reader. Such papers can analyze art, music, literature, current or historical events, political ideas, or scientific research. An analytical thesis statement is therefore often the result of such an analysis of, for example, some literary work (“Heathcliff is meant to be seen as a hero rather than a horrible person”) or a process (“the main challenge recruiters face is the balance between selecting the best candidates and hiring them before they are snatched up by competitors”), or even the latest research (“starving yourself will increase your lifespan, according to science”). In the rest of the paper, you then need to explain how you did the analysis that led you to the stated result and how you arrived at your conclusion, by presenting data and evidence.

Expository thesis statements

An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience, such as a historical development, a current phenomenon, or the effect of political intervention. A typical explanatory thesis statement is therefore often a “topic statement” rather than a claim or actual thesis. An expository essay could, for example, explain “where human rights came from and how they changed the world,” or “how students make career choices.” The rest of the paper then needs to present the reader with all the relevant information on the topic, covering all sides and aspects rather than one specific viewpoint.

Argumentative thesis statements

An argumentative paper makes a clear and potentially very subjective claim and follows up with a justification based on evidence. The claim could be an opinion, a policy proposal, an evaluation, or an interpretation. The goal of the argumentative paper is to convince the audience that the author’s claim is true. A thesis statement for such a paper could be that “every student should be required to take a gap year after high school to gain some life experience”, or that “vaccines should be mandatory”. Argumentative thesis statements can be bold, assertive, and one-sided—you have the rest of the paper to convince the reader that you have good reasons to think that way and that maybe they should think like that, too.

How to Write a Thesis Statement Step-by-Step 

If you are not quite sure how you get from a topic to a thesis statement, then follow this simple process—but make sure you know what type of essay you are supposed to write and adapt the steps to the kind of statement you need. 

First , you will have to select a topic . This might have been done for you already if you are writing an essay as part of a class. If not, then make sure you don’t start too general—narrow the subject down to a specific aspect that you can cover in an essay. 

Second , ask yourself a question about your topic, one that you are personally interested in or one that you think your readers might find relevant or interesting. Here, you have to consider whether you are going to explain something to the reader (expository essay) or if you want to put out your own, potentially controversial, opinion and then argue for it in the rest of your (argumentative) essay.

Third , answer the question you raised for yourself, based on the material you have already sifted through and are planning to present to the reader or the opinion you have already formed on the topic. If your opinion changes while working on your essay, which happens quite often, then make sure you come back to this process and adapt your statement.

Fourth and last, reword the answer to your question into a concise statement . You want the reader to know exactly what is coming, and you also want to make it sound as interesting as possible so that they decide to keep reading.

Let’s look at this example process to give you a better idea of how to get from your topic to your statement. Note that this is the development of a thesis statement for an argumentative essay .

  • Choose a specific topic: Covid-19 vaccines 

Narrow it down to a specific aspect: opposition to Covid-19 vaccines

  • Ask a question: Should vaccination against Covid-19 be mandatory?     
  • Answer the question for yourself, by sorting through the available evidence/arguments:

Yes: vaccination protects other, more vulnerable people; vaccination reduces the spread of the disease; herd immunity will allow societies to go back to normal…

No: vaccines can have side-effects in some people; the vaccines have been developed too fast and there might be unknown risks; the government should stay out of personal decisions on people’s health…

  • Form your opinion and reword it into your thesis statement that represents a very short summary of the key points you base your claim on:

While there is some hesitancy around vaccinations against Covid-19, most of the presented arguments revolve around unfounded fears and the individual freedom to make one’s own decisions. Since that freedom is offset by the benefits of mass vaccination, governments should make vaccines mandatory to help societies get back to normal.

This is a good argumentative thesis statement example because it does not just present a fact that everybody knows and agrees on, but a claim that is debatable and needs to be backed up by data and arguments, which you will do in the rest of your essay. You can introduce whatever evidence and arguments you deem necessary in the following—but make sure that all your points lead back to your core claim and support your opinion. This example also answers the question “how long should a thesis statement be?” One or two sentences are generally enough. If your statement is longer, make sure you are not using vague, empty expressions or more words than necessary .

Good and Bad Thesis Statement Examples

Not-so-good thesis statement : Everyone should get vaccinated against Covid-19.

Problem: The statement does not specify why that might be relevant or why people might not want to do it—this is too vague to spark anyone’s interest.

Good : Since the risks of the currently available Covid-19 vaccines are minimal and societal interests outweigh individual freedom, governments should make Covid-19 vaccination mandatory.

Not-so-good thesis statement : Binge drinking is bad for your health.

Problem: This is a very broad statement that everyone can agree on and nobody needs to read an article on. You need to specify why anyone would not think that way.

Good : Binge drinking has become a trend among college students. While some argue that it might be better for your health than regular consumption of low amounts of alcohol, science says otherwise.

Not-so-good thesis statement : Learning an instrument can develop a child’s cognitive abilities.

Problem: This is a very weak statement—”can” develop doesn’t tell us whether that is what happens in every child, what kind of effects of music education on cognition we can expect, and whether that has or should have any practical implications. 

Good thesis statement : Music education has many surprising benefits on children’s overall development, including effects on language acquisition, coordination, problem-solving, and even social skills.

You could now present all the evidence on the specific effects of music education on children’s specific abilities in the rest of your (expository) essay. You could also turn this into an argumentative essay, by adding your own opinion to your statement:

Good thesis statement : Considering the many surprising benefits that music education has on children’s overall development, every child should be given the opportunity to learn an instrument as part of their public school education.

Not-so-good thesis statement : Outer space exploration is a waste of money.

Problem: While this is a clear statement of your personal opinion that people could potentially disagree with (which is good for an argumentative thesis statement), it lacks context and does not really tell the reader what to expect from your essay.

Good thesis statement : Instead of wasting money on exploring outer space, people like Elon Musk should use their wealth to solve poverty, hunger, global warming, and other issues we are facing on this earth.

Get Professional Thesis Editing Services

Now that you know how to write the perfect thesis statement for your essay, you might be interested in our free grammar checker , the Wordvice AI Proofreader. And after drafting your academic papers, be sure to get proofreading that includes manuscript editing , thesis editing , or dissertation editing services before submitting your work to journals for publication.

We have many more articles for you on all aspects of academic writing , tips and tricks on how to avoid common grammar mistakes , and resources on how to strengthen your writing style in general.

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25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

JBirdwellBranson

Understanding what makes a good thesis statement is one of the major keys to writing a great research paper or argumentative essay. The thesis statement is where you make a claim that will guide you through your entire paper. If you find yourself struggling to make sense of your paper or your topic, then it's likely due to a weak thesis statement.

Let's take a minute to first understand what makes a solid thesis statement, and what key components you need to write one of your own.

Perfecting Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement always goes at the beginning of the paper. It will typically be in the first couple of paragraphs of the paper so that it can introduce the body paragraphs, which are the supporting evidence for your thesis statement.

Your thesis statement should clearly identify an argument. You need to have a statement that is not only easy to understand, but one that is debatable. What that means is that you can't just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute . An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic.

Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's cuteness is derived from its floppy ears, small body, and playfulness." These are three things that can be debated on. Some people might think that the cutest thing about puppies is the fact that they follow you around or that they're really soft and fuzzy.

All cuteness aside, you want to make sure that your thesis statement is not only debatable, but that it also actually thoroughly answers the research question that was posed. You always want to make sure that your evidence is supporting a claim that you made (and not the other way around). This is why it's crucial to read and research about a topic first and come to a conclusion later. If you try to get your research to fit your thesis statement, then it may not work out as neatly as you think. As you learn more, you discover more (and the outcome may not be what you originally thought).

Additionally, your thesis statement shouldn't be too big or too grand. It'll be hard to cover everything in a thesis statement like, "The federal government should act now on climate change." The topic is just too large to actually say something new and meaningful. Instead, a more effective thesis statement might be, "Local governments can combat climate change by providing citizens with larger recycling bins and offering local classes about composting and conservation." This is easier to work with because it's a smaller idea, but you can also discuss the overall topic that you might be interested in, which is climate change.

So, now that we know what makes a good, solid thesis statement, you can start to write your own. If you find that you're getting stuck or you are the type of person who needs to look at examples before you start something, then check out our list of thesis statement examples below.

Thesis statement examples

A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.

  • Vaccinations Because many children are unable to vaccinate due to illness, we must require that all healthy and able children be vaccinated in order to have herd immunity.
  • Educational Resources for Low-Income Students Schools should provide educational resources for low-income students during the summers so that they don't forget what they've learned throughout the school year.
  • School Uniforms School uniforms may be an upfront cost for families, but they eradicate the visual differences in income between students and provide a more egalitarian atmosphere at school.
  • Populism The rise in populism on the 2016 political stage was in reaction to increasing globalization, the decline of manufacturing jobs, and the Syrian refugee crisis.
  • Public Libraries Libraries are essential resources for communities and should be funded more heavily by local municipalities.
  • Cyber Bullying With more and more teens using smartphones and social media, cyber bullying is on the rise. Cyber bullying puts a lot of stress on many teens, and can cause depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts. Parents should limit the usage of smart phones, monitor their children's online activity, and report any cyber bullying to school officials in order to combat this problem.
  • Medical Marijuana for Veterans Studies have shown that the use of medicinal marijuana has been helpful to veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Medicinal marijuana prescriptions should be legal in all states and provided to these veterans. Additional medical or therapy services should also be researched and implemented in order to help them re-integrate back into civilian life.
  • Work-Life Balance Corporations should provide more work from home opportunities and six-hour workdays so that office workers have a better work-life balance and are more likely to be productive when they are in the office.
  • Teaching Youths about Consensual Sex Although sex education that includes a discussion of consensual sex would likely lead to less sexual assault, parents need to teach their children the meaning of consent from a young age with age appropriate lessons.
  • Whether or Not to Attend University A degree from a university provides invaluable lessons on life and a future career, but not every high school student should be encouraged to attend a university directly after graduation. Some students may benefit from a trade school or a "gap year" where they can think more intensely about what it is they want to do for a career and how they can accomplish this.
  • Studying Abroad Studying abroad is one of the most culturally valuable experiences you can have in college. It is the only way to get completely immersed in another language and learn how other cultures and countries are different from your own.
  • Women's Body Image Magazines have done a lot in the last five years to include a more diverse group of models, but there is still a long way to go to promote a healthy woman's body image collectively as a culture.
  • Cigarette Tax Heavily taxing and increasing the price of cigarettes is essentially a tax on the poorest Americans, and it doesn't deter them from purchasing. Instead, the state and federal governments should target those economically disenfranchised with early education about the dangers of smoking.
  • Veganism A vegan diet, while a healthy and ethical way to consume food, indicates a position of privilege. It also limits you to other cultural food experiences if you travel around the world.
  • University Athletes Should be Compensated University athletes should be compensated for their service to the university, as it is difficult for these students to procure and hold a job with busy academic and athletic schedules. Many student athletes on scholarship also come from low-income neighborhoods and it is a struggle to make ends meet when they are participating in athletics.
  • Women in the Workforce Sheryl Sandberg makes a lot of interesting points in her best-selling book, Lean In , but she only addressed the very privileged working woman and failed to speak to those in lower-skilled, lower-wage jobs.
  • Assisted Suicide Assisted suicide should be legal and doctors should have the ability to make sure their patients have the end-of-life care that they want to receive.
  • Celebrity and Political Activism Although Taylor Swift's lyrics are indicative of a feminist perspective, she should be more politically active and vocal to use her position of power for the betterment of society.
  • The Civil War The insistence from many Southerners that the South seceded from the Union for states' rights versus the fact that they seceded for the purposes of continuing slavery is a harmful myth that still affects race relations today.
  • Blue Collar Workers Coal miners and other blue-collar workers whose jobs are slowly disappearing from the workforce should be re-trained in jobs in the technology sector or in renewable energy. A program to re-train these workers would not only improve local economies where jobs have been displaced, but would also lead to lower unemployment nationally.
  • Diversity in the Workforce Having a diverse group of people in an office setting leads to richer ideas, more cooperation, and more empathy between people with different skin colors or backgrounds.
  • Re-Imagining the Nuclear Family The nuclear family was traditionally defined as one mother, one father, and 2.5 children. This outdated depiction of family life doesn't quite fit with modern society. The definition of normal family life shouldn't be limited to two-parent households.
  • Digital Literacy Skills With more information readily available than ever before, it's crucial that students are prepared to examine the material they're reading and determine whether or not it's a good source or if it has misleading information. Teaching students digital literacy and helping them to understand the difference between opinion or propaganda from legitimate, real information is integral.
  • Beauty Pageants Beauty pageants are presented with the angle that they empower women. However, putting women in a swimsuit on a stage while simultaneously judging them on how well they answer an impossible question in a short period of time is cruel and purely for the amusement of men. Therefore, we should stop televising beauty pageants.
  • Supporting More Women to Run for a Political Position In order to get more women into political positions, more women must run for office. There must be a grassroots effort to educate women on how to run for office, who among them should run, and support for a future candidate for getting started on a political career.

Still stuck? Need some help with your thesis statement?

If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you're on the right track. It's always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.

After you're done writing, it's important to have someone take a second look at your paper so that you can ensure there are no mistakes or errors. It's difficult to spot your own mistakes, which is why it's always recommended to have someone help you with the revision process, whether that's a teacher, the writing center at school, or a professional editor such as one from ServiceScape .

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How to write a thesis statement, what is a thesis statement.

Almost all of us—even if we don’t do it consciously—look early in an essay for a one- or two-sentence condensation of the argument or analysis that is to follow. We refer to that condensation as a thesis statement.

Why Should Your Essay Contain a Thesis Statement?

  • to test your ideas by distilling them into a sentence or two
  • to better organize and develop your argument
  • to provide your reader with a “guide” to your argument

In general, your thesis statement will accomplish these goals if you think of the thesis as the answer to the question your paper explores.

How Can You Write a Good Thesis Statement?

Here are some helpful hints to get you started. You can either scroll down or select a link to a specific topic.

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned

Almost all assignments, no matter how complicated, can be reduced to a single question. Your first step, then, is to distill the assignment into a specific question. For example, if your assignment is, “Write a report to the local school board explaining the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class,” turn the request into a question like, “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” After you’ve chosen the question your essay will answer, compose one or two complete sentences answering that question.

Q: “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” A: “The potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class are . . .”
A: “Using computers in a fourth-grade class promises to improve . . .”

The answer to the question is the thesis statement for the essay.

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How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned

Even if your assignment doesn’t ask a specific question, your thesis statement still needs to answer a question about the issue you’d like to explore. In this situation, your job is to figure out what question you’d like to write about.

A good thesis statement will usually include the following four attributes:

  • take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree
  • deal with a subject that can be adequately treated given the nature of the assignment
  • express one main idea
  • assert your conclusions about a subject

Let’s see how to generate a thesis statement for a social policy paper.

Brainstorm the topic . Let’s say that your class focuses upon the problems posed by changes in the dietary habits of Americans. You find that you are interested in the amount of sugar Americans consume.

You start out with a thesis statement like this:

Sugar consumption.

This fragment isn’t a thesis statement. Instead, it simply indicates a general subject. Furthermore, your reader doesn’t know what you want to say about sugar consumption.

Narrow the topic . Your readings about the topic, however, have led you to the conclusion that elementary school children are consuming far more sugar than is healthy.

You change your thesis to look like this:

Reducing sugar consumption by elementary school children.

This fragment not only announces your subject, but it focuses on one segment of the population: elementary school children. Furthermore, it raises a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree, because while most people might agree that children consume more sugar than they used to, not everyone would agree on what should be done or who should do it. You should note that this fragment is not a thesis statement because your reader doesn’t know your conclusions on the topic.

Take a position on the topic. After reflecting on the topic a little while longer, you decide that what you really want to say about this topic is that something should be done to reduce the amount of sugar these children consume.

You revise your thesis statement to look like this:

More attention should be paid to the food and beverage choices available to elementary school children.

This statement asserts your position, but the terms more attention and food and beverage choices are vague.

Use specific language . You decide to explain what you mean about food and beverage choices , so you write:

Experts estimate that half of elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar.

This statement is specific, but it isn’t a thesis. It merely reports a statistic instead of making an assertion.

Make an assertion based on clearly stated support. You finally revise your thesis statement one more time to look like this:

Because half of all American elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar, schools should be required to replace the beverages in soda machines with healthy alternatives.

Notice how the thesis answers the question, “What should be done to reduce sugar consumption by children, and who should do it?” When you started thinking about the paper, you may not have had a specific question in mind, but as you became more involved in the topic, your ideas became more specific. Your thesis changed to reflect your new insights.

How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One

1. a strong thesis statement takes some sort of stand..

Remember that your thesis needs to show your conclusions about a subject. For example, if you are writing a paper for a class on fitness, you might be asked to choose a popular weight-loss product to evaluate. Here are two thesis statements:

There are some negative and positive aspects to the Banana Herb Tea Supplement.

This is a weak thesis statement. First, it fails to take a stand. Second, the phrase negative and positive aspects is vague.

Because Banana Herb Tea Supplement promotes rapid weight loss that results in the loss of muscle and lean body mass, it poses a potential danger to customers.

This is a strong thesis because it takes a stand, and because it's specific.

2. A strong thesis statement justifies discussion.

Your thesis should indicate the point of the discussion. If your assignment is to write a paper on kinship systems, using your own family as an example, you might come up with either of these two thesis statements:

My family is an extended family.

This is a weak thesis because it merely states an observation. Your reader won’t be able to tell the point of the statement, and will probably stop reading.

While most American families would view consanguineal marriage as a threat to the nuclear family structure, many Iranian families, like my own, believe that these marriages help reinforce kinship ties in an extended family.

This is a strong thesis because it shows how your experience contradicts a widely-accepted view. A good strategy for creating a strong thesis is to show that the topic is controversial. Readers will be interested in reading the rest of the essay to see how you support your point.

3. A strong thesis statement expresses one main idea.

Readers need to be able to see that your paper has one main point. If your thesis statement expresses more than one idea, then you might confuse your readers about the subject of your paper. For example:

Companies need to exploit the marketing potential of the Internet, and Web pages can provide both advertising and customer support.

This is a weak thesis statement because the reader can’t decide whether the paper is about marketing on the Internet or Web pages. To revise the thesis, the relationship between the two ideas needs to become more clear. One way to revise the thesis would be to write:

Because the Internet is filled with tremendous marketing potential, companies should exploit this potential by using Web pages that offer both advertising and customer support.

This is a strong thesis because it shows that the two ideas are related. Hint: a great many clear and engaging thesis statements contain words like because , since , so , although , unless , and however .

4. A strong thesis statement is specific.

A thesis statement should show exactly what your paper will be about, and will help you keep your paper to a manageable topic. For example, if you're writing a seven-to-ten page paper on hunger, you might say:

World hunger has many causes and effects.

This is a weak thesis statement for two major reasons. First, world hunger can’t be discussed thoroughly in seven to ten pages. Second, many causes and effects is vague. You should be able to identify specific causes and effects. A revised thesis might look like this:

Hunger persists in Glandelinia because jobs are scarce and farming in the infertile soil is rarely profitable.

This is a strong thesis statement because it narrows the subject to a more specific and manageable topic, and it also identifies the specific causes for the existence of hunger.

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