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Mental health informative speech topics | example & outline.

It’s important to be informed about mental health, especially since it’s something that so many people struggle with. In this article, we’ll cover some mental health informative speech topics that can help you raise awareness and start conversations about this important issue.

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Mental Health Informative Speech Ideas

What You'll Learn

When it comes to giving a speech, there are many different topics that you can choose from. However, if you want to give an informative speech about mental health, then you will need to make sure that you choose a topic that is both interesting and informative. To help you get started, here are some mental health informative speech ideas:

1. The Importance of Mental Health

2. The Different Types of Mental Illness

3. The Causes of Mental Illness

4. The Symptoms of Mental Illness

5. The Treatments for Mental Illness

6. The Impact of Mental Illness on Society

7. The Stigma Associated with Mental Illness

8. How to Help Someone with Mental Illness

9. mental Health in the Workplace 10. How to Talk about Mental Healthwith Family and Friends

Mental Health Speech Ideas

When it comes to giving a mental health speech, there are many different topics that you can choose to discuss. However, it is important to make sure that you select a topic that will be both informative and interesting to your audience. To help get you started, here are four mental health speech ideas:

This is a great topic for an informative speech as it can help to educate your audience on the importance of looking after their mental health. You could discuss the various factors that can impact mental health, such as stress, diet, and exercise. Additionally, you could provide tips on how to improve mental wellbeing.

2. The Warning Signs of Mental Illness

Another informative topic for a mental health speech is discussing the warning signs of mental illness. This can help people to better understand when they or someone they know may be developing a mental illness. It is important to note that not all warning signs will be present in every case, but some common ones include changes in mood, sleep patterns, and appetite.

3. The Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness

Unfortunately, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding mental illness which can make it difficult forpeople to seek help. This topic can be used to raise awareness of the stigma and to encourage people to break the silence around mental illness. Additionally, you could provide tips on how to support someone with a mental illness.

4. Personal Stories

Finally, another option for a mental health speech is to share personal stories. This could either be your own story or that of someone you know. Sharing personal stories can help to break down the barriers around mental illness and show people that they are not alone.

Hopefully, these mental health speech ideas have given you some inspiration for your next speech. Remember to choose a topic that you are passionate about so that you can deliver an engaging and informative speech.

In this article, we'll cover some mental health informative speech topics that can help you raise awareness and start conversations about this important issue.

Mental Health Informative Speech Topics

It can be difficult to come up with ideas for an informative speech, especially when the topic is something sensitive like mental health. In this article, we’ll give you some Mental Health Informative Speech Topics that will help you get started on your next big project!

When it comes to mental health, there are a lot of informative speech topics to choose from. Whether you want to educate others about mental illness, the warning signs of suicide, or how to cope with anxiety and depression, there is a wealth of information out there.

In this blog section, we’ll explore some of the most popular mental health informative speech topics. We’ll provide an overview of each topic, as well as some tips on how to deliver an effective and engaging speech.

Mental Health Informative Speech Topic #1: Mental Illness

There are many different types of mental illness, and it’s important to educate yourself and others about the signs and symptoms. Mental illness can be difficult to identify, but it’s important to be aware of the warning signs so that you can get help if you or someone you know is struggling.

Mental Health Informative Speech Topic #2: Suicide Prevention

Suicide is a serious issue, and it’s important to be familiar with the warning signs. If you or someone you know is in danger of harming themselves, it’s vital to get help immediately. There are many resources available to those in need, so don’t hesitate to reach out for help

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When it comes to giving an informative speech, there are many potential topics to choose from. But if you want to focus on mental health, there are a few key ideas that can make for an interesting and enlightening speech.

For example, you could discuss the different types of mental illness and how they can be treated. Or you could talk about the warning signs of mental illness and how to get help. You could also focus on the importance of mental health in overall wellness, or share stories about people who have overcome mental illness.

No matter what angle you take, informative speeches about mental health can be both educational and inspiring. So if you’re looking for a topic that will engage your audience and leave them wanting to learn more, consider one of these mental health topics for your next speech.

Mental Health Informative Speech

Informative speeches about mental health can be a great way to raise awareness about important topics related to mental health. By talking about mental health, you can help to break the stigma that often surrounds mental illness and help others to understand more about these conditions. If you are considering giving an informative speech about mental health, here are some potential topics that you could discuss:

1. The different types of mental illness. 2. The symptoms of mental illness. 3. The causes of mental illness. 4. The treatments available for mental illness. 5. The impact of mental illness on individuals and families. 6. The importance of early intervention for mental illness. 7. The challenges faced by people living with mental illness. 8. How to support someone with mental illness. 9. Mental health in the workplace. 10. Promoting positive mental health

informative speech topics on health and fitness

When it comes to giving an informative speech, there are many topics that you can choose from. However, if you want your audience to really learn something new and gain some valuable information, then you should consider talking about health and fitness. After all, these are two topics that affect everyone in some way or another.

There are a lot of different aspects to health and fitness that you can cover in your speech. For example, you could talk about the importance of exercise and how it can impact our overall health. You could also discuss the benefits of eating healthy and how it can help improve our mood and energy levels.

Of course, there are also some risks associated with being unhealthy that you could address as well. For instance, you could discuss the dangers of obesity and how it can lead to serious health problems like heart disease and diabetes.

Comprehesive SOAP Notes Examples

No matter what angle you decide to take, there is no doubt that informative speech topics on health and fitness will be both interesting and informative for your audience. So if you’re looking for a way to really engage your audience and teach them something new, then this is definitely the route you should take!

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  • Informative Speech

Informative Speech Outline

Last updated on: Jun 21, 2023

Learn How to Create an Informative Speech Outline

By: Cathy A.

Reviewed By: Rylee W.

Published on: May 26, 2020

Informative Speech Outline

Giving a speech can be really nerve-wracking, especially if you're not sure where to start. 

Most people try to wing it, and that's why they bomb. They get up in front of an audience and have no idea what to say next. This is why an outline is necessary.

We've got your back with our informative speech outline. Here you will learn how to outline your speech in the easiest way. 

So get ready to learn so that you can deliver a powerful, memorable speech that leaves your audience wanting more.

Informative Speech Outline

On this Page

What is an Informative Speech? 

An informative speech is a powerful way of sharing knowledge with your audience. It needs to be well-formatted and properly structured. 

This type of speech allows you to inform the audience and share detailed information about a topic. 

Moreover, the general purpose of an informative speech is to educate the audience about any subject. Also, there are different types of informative speeches, but the purpose is the same for all types.  

However, to write a good informative speech, you should create an outline first. 

Unfortunately, many people are intimidated by the idea of outlining because they don't know how to do it or what type of outline should be used. 

So, continue reading to learn how to make a perfect informative speech outline.  

An informative speech outline helps to organize your ideas and thoughts before you start writing. It allows you to see the flow of your speech and that all main points are cohesive with each other. 

An effective speaker should always create an outline for an informative speech. Without a perfect outline, you will never write a great speech. 

A clear and concise outline helps a speaker develop their thoughts on a topic. It also creates a structure to help them keep track of all the points they want to make.

There are two ways to outline your speech, and each has its own purpose and advantages:

  • Complete Sentence Format: In this type, the speaker writes full sentences that help you check the content of the speech.  

      2. Key Point Format: Note down the main points that help you remember what you should include in your speech. 

Therefore, you have the chance to choose whichever outline format suits your needs best. Once your outline is complete, you'll have an idea of how the speech will go. 

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How to Write an Informative Speech Outline? 

An outline is a great way to organize your ideas before you start writing. A great informative speech starts with the perfect outline. It's not as difficult as you may think if you follow some steps. 

“How do you create an outline for an informative speech?”

Below are the steps that will help you in creating a well-written outline without any problem.  

1. Choose a Topic that Interests You

Speech topics are usually assigned, but if you have to pick on your own, create a list of topics that interest you. Select one topic from the plethora of ideas about which there is still so much to learn and explore.

Also, think of unique and interesting informative speech topics for the audience. 

Since it is a descriptive speech, the topic should give you the space to provide information to the audience. 

2. Gather Information

After choosing the topic, start the research phase and gather relevant information. The information should be so that it helps to satisfy your specific purpose of delivering the speech. 

Also, make sure that you collect information from credible and trustworthy sources. You can collect data for your speech from:

  • Scholarly articles 
  • Encyclopedias
  • Government documents

The more you research, the more easily you write a good informative speech. 

3. Create the Outline 

Now that you have all the information, start writing the outline. But first, make sure that you follow the proper outline format. Without a proper format, you will miss many important points and end up with a poor outline.

As discussed earlier, an outline has three sections, including an introduction, body, and conclusion.

  • The introduction is the first paragraph that discusses the main points of the essay.
  • The body provides examples and supporting evidence to prove those arguments.
  • Lastly, the conclusion provides a brief summary of the entire essay and restates the thesis statement .

Informative Speech Outline Format

An outline is the backbone of a well-delivered and interesting speech. 

“What are the 3 main parts of the informative speech outline?”

Every good outline contains three main parts:

1. Introduction

  • Grab the audience's attention  
  • Include the speaker’s opinion or hypothesis
  • Present thesis statement
  • Outline the main points with real-world examples and supporting facts
  • Use transition between main points

3. Conclusion

  • Summarize the main points
  • Restate the thesis statement 

Here is a template that gives you a better idea of crafting an outline. 

Done with understanding what an informative speech outline is? Now let’s move to view some examples of informative speech outlines for free. All the examples below are free and easy to download!

Informative Speech Outline Examples 

Writing an outline for a speech might seem like a daunting task. However, if you have examples that professional writers write, you can easily create a good one.  

Check the below informative speech outline samples and get an idea of the perfect outline. 

Simple Informative Speech Outline Example

Informative Speech Outline NSDA

Informative Speech Outline about Social Media

Informative Speech Outline about Depression

Informative Speech Outline about Covid 19

Global Warming Informative Speech Outline

Mental Health Informative Speech Outline

Anxiety Informative Speech Outline

Sleep Informative Speech Outline

Informative Speech Outline About Education

Informative Speech Outline Format 3-5 Minutes

Taking Depression Seriously Informative Speech Outline

Sample Informative Speech Outline

Mental Illness Informative Speech Outline

Tips for Writing the Informative Speech Outline 

An informative speech is a type that connects with its audience by educating them about a certain topic. Following are the tips you should follow to impress the audience with your speech. 

  • Start with a clear and concise thesis statement that states the main topic or purpose of your speech.
  • Identify and prioritize the main points or key ideas you want to cover in your speech.
  • Organize your main points in a logical order, such as chronological, spatial, or topical sequence.
  • Develop subpoints or supporting details for each main point to provide more depth and clarity.
  • Consider using a consistent structure, such as the problem-solution, cause-effect, or compare-contrast format, depending on the nature of your topic.
  • Use a consistent numbering or lettering system to indicate the hierarchy and relationship between main points and subpoints.
  • Ensure that each main point and subpoint contributes to the overall coherence and flow of your speech.
  • Incorporate transitions between different sections of your outline to create smooth transitions between ideas.
  • Include visual aids, any necessary evidence, statistics, or examples to support your main points and make your speech more credible and persuasive.
  • Review and revise your outline to ensure it is well-organized, balanced, and effectively conveys the information you want to present.

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Mistakes To Avoid While Creating Informative Speech Outline

Here are mistakes to avoid while creating an informative speech outline:

  • Do not overload your outline with excessive information, as it can overwhelm your audience.
  • Steer clear of a disorganized structure that confuses your audience.
  • Do not provide shallow information; instead, ensure depth and substance in your main points.
  • Avoid neglecting transitions, as it can disrupt the flow of your speech.
  • Do not overlook the importance of engaging your audience through visuals, storytelling, and rhetoric.
  • Avoid inadequate time management, as it can lead to rushing or exceeding the allocated time.

Wrapping Up! Now, you have a complete guide to writing an informative speech outline. However, if you need professional help in creating a speech that is an attention-getter, consult MyPerfectPaper.net. 

Our team of professional writers will help you create an engaging, interesting, and creative speech. Whether it be a demonstration speech, explanatory speech, informative essay, or persuasive speech, our team of experts is ready to help you. All you have to say is ‘ do my paper ’, and writers will take your writing stress away! 

So, contact us now and get our essay writer help at affordable rates. 

Cathy A.

Marketing, Literature

Cathy has been been working as an author on our platform for over five years now. She has a Masters degree in mass communication and is well-versed in the art of writing. Cathy is a professional who takes her work seriously and is widely appreciated by clients for her excellent writing skills.

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informative speech outline about health

Planning and Presenting an Informative Speech

In this guide, you can learn about the purposes and types of informative speeches, about writing and delivering informative speeches, and about the parts of informative speeches.

Purposes of Informative Speaking

Informative speaking offers you an opportunity to practice your researching, writing, organizing, and speaking skills. You will learn how to discover and present information clearly. If you take the time to thoroughly research and understand your topic, to create a clearly organized speech, and to practice an enthusiastic, dynamic style of delivery, you can be an effective "teacher" during your informative speech. Finally, you will get a chance to practice a type of speaking you will undoubtedly use later in your professional career.

The purpose of the informative speech is to provide interesting, useful, and unique information to your audience. By dedicating yourself to the goals of providing information and appealing to your audience, you can take a positive step toward succeeding in your efforts as an informative speaker.

Major Types of Informative Speeches

In this guide, we focus on informative speeches about:

These categories provide an effective method of organizing and evaluating informative speeches. Although they are not absolute, these categories provide a useful starting point for work on your speech.

In general, you will use four major types of informative speeches. While you can classify informative speeches many ways, the speech you deliver will fit into one of four major categories.

Speeches about Objects

Speeches about objects focus on things existing in the world. Objects include, among other things, people, places, animals, or products.

Because you are speaking under time constraints, you cannot discuss any topic in its entirety. Instead, limit your speech to a focused discussion of some aspect of your topic.

Some example topics for speeches about objects include: the Central Intelligence Agency, tombstones, surgical lasers, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the pituitary gland, and lemmings.

To focus these topics, you could give a speech about Franklin Delano Roosevelt and efforts to conceal how he suffered from polio while he was in office. Or, a speech about tombstones could focus on the creation and original designs of grave markers.

Speeches about Processes

Speeches about processes focus on patterns of action. One type of speech about processes, the demonstration speech, teaches people "how-to" perform a process. More frequently, however, you will use process speeches to explain a process in broader terms. This way, the audience is more likely to understand the importance or the context of the process.

A speech about how milk is pasteurized would not teach the audience how to milk cows. Rather, this speech could help audience members understand the process by making explicit connections between patterns of action (the pasteurization process) and outcomes (a safe milk supply).

Other examples of speeches about processes include: how the Internet works (not "how to work the Internet"), how to construct a good informative speech, and how to research the job market. As with any speech, be sure to limit your discussion to information you can explain clearly and completely within time constraints.

Speeches about Events

Speeches about events focus on things that happened, are happening, or will happen. When speaking about an event, remember to relate the topic to your audience. A speech chronicling history is informative, but you should adapt the information to your audience and provide them with some way to use the information. As always, limit your focus to those aspects of an event that can be adequately discussed within the time limitations of your assignment.

Examples of speeches about events include: the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, Groundhog's Day, the Battle of the Bulge, the World Series, and the 2000 Presidential Elections.

Speeches about Concepts

Speeches about concepts focus on beliefs, ideas, and theories. While speeches about objects, processes, and events are fairly concrete, speeches about concepts are more abstract. Take care to be clear and understandable when creating and presenting a speech about a concept. When selecting a concept, remember you are crafting an informative speech. Often, speeches about concepts take on a persuasive tone. Focus your efforts toward providing unbiased information and refrain from making arguments. Because concepts can be vague and involved, limit your speech to aspects that can be readily explained and understood within the time limits.

Some examples of topics for concept speeches include: democracy, Taoism, principles of feminism, the philosophy of non-violent protest, and the Big Bang theory.

Strategies for Selecting a Topic

In many cases, circumstances will dictate the topic of your speech. However, if the topic has not been assigned or if you are having difficulty figuring out how to frame your topic as an informative speech,the following may be useful.

Begin by thinking of your interests. If you have always loved art, contemplate possible topics dealing with famous artists, art works, or different types of art. If you are employed, think of aspects of your job or aspects of your employer's business that would be interesting to talk about. While you cannot substitute personal experience for detailed research, your own experience can supplement your research and add vitality to your presentation. Choose one of the items below to learn more about selecting a topic.

Learn More about an Unfamiliar Topic

You may benefit more by selecting an unfamiliar topic that interests you. You can challenge yourself by choosing a topic you'd like to learn about and to help others understand it. If the Buddhist religion has always been an interesting and mysterious topic to you, research the topic and create a speech that offers an understandable introduction to the religion. Remember to adapt Buddhism to your audience and tell them why you think this information is useful to them. By taking this approach, you can learn something new and learn how to synthesize new information for your audience.

Think about Previous Classes

You might find a topic by thinking of classes you have taken. Think back to concepts covered in those classes and consider whether they would serve as unique, interesting, and enlightening topics for the informative speech. In astronomy, you learned about red giants. In history, you learned about Napoleon. In political science, you learned about The Federalist Papers. Past classes serve as rich resources for informative speech topics. If you make this choice, use your class notes and textbook as a starting point. To fully develop the content, you will need to do extensive research and perhaps even a few interviews.

Talk to Others

Topic selection does not have to be an individual effort. Spend time talking about potential topics with classmates or friends. This method can be extremely effective because other people can stimulate further ideas when you get stuck. When you use this method, always keep the basic requirements and the audience in mind. Just because you and your friend think home-brew is a great topic does not mean it will enthrall your audience or impress your instructor. While you talk with your classmates or friends, jot notes about potential topics and create a master list when you exhaust the possibilities. From this list, choose a topic with intellectual merit, originality, and potential to entertain while informing.

Framing a Thesis Statement

Once you settle on a topic, you need to frame a thesis statement. Framing a thesis statement allows you to narrow your topic, and in turns allows you to focus your research in this specific area, saving you time and trouble in the process.

Selecting a topic and focusing it into a thesis statement can be a difficult process. Fortunately, a number of useful strategies are available to you.

Thesis Statement Purpose

The thesis statement is crucial for clearly communicating your topic and purpose to the audience. Be sure to make the statement clear, concise, and easy to remember. Deliver it to the audience and use verbal and nonverbal illustrations to make it stand out.

Strategies For Framing a Thesis Statement

Focus on a specific aspect of your topic and phrase the thesis statement in one clear, concise, complete sentence, focusing on the audience. This sentence sets a goal for the speech. For example, in a speech about art, the thesis statement might be: "The purpose of this speech is to inform my audience about the early works of Vincent van Gogh." This statement establishes that the speech will inform the audience about the early works of one great artist. The thesis statement is worded conversationally and included in the delivery of the speech.

Thesis Statement and Audience

The thesis appears in the introduction of the speech so that the audience immediately realizes the speaker's topic and goal. Whatever the topic may be, you should attempt to create a clear, focused thesis statement that stands out and could be repeated by every member of your audience. It is important to refer to the audience in the thesis statement; when you look back at the thesis for direction, or when the audience hears the thesis, it should be clear that the most important goal of your speech is to inform the audience about your topic. While the focus and pressure will be on you as a speaker, you should always remember that the audience is the reason for presenting a public speech.

Avoid being too trivial or basic for the average audience member. At the same time, avoid being too technical for the average audience member. Be sure to use specific, concrete terms that clearly establish the focus of your speech.

Thesis Statement and Delivery

When creating the thesis statement, be sure to use a full sentence and frame that sentence as a statement, not as a question. The full sentence, "The purpose of this speech is to inform my audience about the early works of Vincent van Gogh," provides clear direction for the speech, whereas the fragment "van Gogh" says very little about the purpose of the speech. Similarly, the question "Who was Vincent van Gogh?" does not adequately indicate the direction the speech will take or what the speaker hopes to accomplish.

If you limit your thesis statement to one distinct aspect of the larger topic, you are more likely to be understood and to meet the time constraints.

Researching Your Topic

As you begin to work on your informative speech, you will find that you need to gather additional information. Your instructor will most likely require that you locate relevant materials in the library and cite those materials in your speech. In this section, we discuss the process of researching your topic and thesis.

Conducting research for a major informative speech can be a daunting task. In this section, we discuss a number of strategies and techniques that you can use to gather and organize source materials for your speech.

Gathering Materials

Gathering materials can be a daunting task. You may want to do some research before you choose a topic. Once you have a topic, you have many options for finding information. You can conduct interviews, write or call for information from a clearinghouse or public relations office, and consult books, magazines, journals, newspapers, television and radio programs, and government documents. The library will probably be your primary source of information. You can use many of the libraries databases or talk to a reference librarian to learn how to conduct efficient research.

Taking Notes

While doing your research, you may want to carry notecards. When you come across a useful passage, copy the source and the information onto the notecard or copy and paste the information. You should maintain a working bibliography as you research so you always know which sources you have consulted and so the process of writing citations into the speech and creating the bibliography will be easier. You'll need to determine what information-recording strategies work best for you. Talk to other students, instructors, and librarians to get tips on conducting efficient research. Spend time refining your system and you will soon be able to focus on the information instead of the record-keeping tasks.

Citing Sources Within Your Speech

Consult with your instructor to determine how much research/source information should be included in your speech. Realize that a source citation within your speech is defined as a reference to or quotation from material you have gathered during your research and an acknowledgement of the source. For example, within your speech you might say: "As John W. Bobbitt said in the December 22, 1993, edition of the Denver Post , 'Ouch!'" In this case, you have included a direct quotation and provided the source of the quotation. If you do not quote someone, you might say: "After the first week of the 1995 baseball season, attendance was down 13.5% from 1994. This statistic appeared in the May 7, 1995, edition of the Denver Post ." Whatever the case, whenever you use someone else's ideas, thoughts, or words, you must provide a source citation to give proper credit to the creator of the information. Failure to cite sources can be interpreted as plagiarism which is a serious offense. Upon review of the specific case, plagiarism can result in failure of the assignment, the course, or even dismissal from the University. Take care to cite your sources and give credit where it is due.

Creating Your Bibliography

As with all aspects of your speech, be sure to check with your instructor to get specific details about the assignment.

Generally, the bibliography includes only those sources you cited during the speech. Don't pad the bibliography with every source you read, saw on the shelf, or heard of from friends. When you create the bibliography, you should simply go through your complete sentence outline and list each source you cite. This is also a good way to check if you have included enough reference material within the speech. You will need to alphabetize the bibiography by authors last name and include the following information: author's name, article title, publication title, volume, date, page number(s). You may need to include additional information; you need to talk with your instructor to confirm the required bibliographical format.

Some Cautions

When doing research, use caution in choosing your sources. You need to determine which sources are more credible than others and attempt to use a wide variety of materials. The broader the scope of your research, the more impressive and believable your information. You should draw from different sources (e.g., a variety of magazines-- Time, Newsweek, US News & World Report, National Review, Mother Jones ) as well as different types of sources (i.e., use interviews, newspapers, periodicals, and books instead of just newspapers). The greater your variety, the more apparent your hard work and effort will be. Solid research skills result in increased credibility and effectiveness for the speaker.

Structuring an Informative Speech

Typically, informative speeches have three parts:

Introduction

In this section, we discuss the three parts of an informative speech, calling attention to specific elements that can enhance the effectiveness of your speech. As a speaker, you will want to create a clear structure for your speech. In this section, you will find discussions of the major parts of the informative speech.

The introduction sets the tone of the entire speech. The introduction should be brief and to-the-point as it accomplishes these several important tasks. Typically, there are six main components of an effective introduction:

Attention Getters

Thesis statement, audience adaptation, credibility statement, transition to the body.

As in any social situation, your audience makes strong assumptions about you during the first eight or ten seconds of your speech. For this reason, you need to start solidly and launch the topic clearly. Focus your efforts on completing these tasks and moving on to the real information (the body) of the speech. Typically, there are six main components of an effective introduction. These tasks do not have to be handled in this order, but this layout often yields the best results.

The attention-getter is designed to intrigue the audience members and to motivate them to listen attentively for the next several minutes. There are infinite possibilities for attention-getting devices. Some of the more common devices include using a story, a rhetorical question, or a quotation. While any of these devices can be effective, it is important for you to spend time strategizing, creating, and practicing the attention-getter.

Most importantly, an attention-getter should create curiosity in the minds of your listeners and convince them that the speech will be interesting and useful. The wording of your attention-getter should be refined and practiced. Be sure to consider the mood/tone of your speech; determine the appropriateness of humor, emotion, aggressiveness, etc. Not only should the words get the audiences attention, but your delivery should be smooth and confident to let the audience know that you are a skilled speaker who is prepared for this speech.

The crowd was wild. The music was booming. The sun was shining. The cash registers were ringing.

This story-like re-creation of the scene at a Farm Aid concert serves to engage the audience and causes them to think about the situation you are describing. Touching stories or stories that make audience members feel involved with the topic serve as good attention-getters. You should tell a story with feeling and deliver it directly to the audience instead of reading it off your notecards.

Example Text : One dark summer night in 1849, a young woman in her 20's left Bucktown, Maryland, and followed the North Star. What was her name? Harriet Tubman. She went back some 19 times to rescue her fellow slaves. And as James Blockson relates in a 1984 issue of National Geographic , by the end of her career, she had a $40,000.00 price on her head. This was quite a compliment from her enemies (Blockson 22).

Rhetorical Question

Rhetorical questions are questions designed to arouse curiosity without requiring an answer. Either the answer will be obvious, or if it isn't apparent, the question will arouse curiosity until the presentation provides the answer.

An example of a rhetorical question to gain the audiences attention for a speech about fly-fishing is, "Have you ever stood in a freezing river at 5 o'clock in the morning by choice?"

Example Text: Have you ever heard of a railroad with no tracks, with secret stations, and whose conductors were considered criminals?

A quotation from a famous person or from an expert on your topic can gain the attention of the audience. The use of a quotation immediately launches you into the speech and focuses the audience on your topic area. If it is from a well-known source, cite the author first. If the source is obscure, begin with the quote itself.

Example Text : "No day dawns for the slave, nor is it looked for. It is all night--night forever . . . ." (Pause) This quote was taken from Jermain Loguen, a fugitive who was the son of his Tennessee master and a slave woman.

Unusual Statement

Making a statement that is unusual to the ears of your listeners is another possibility for gaining their attention.

Example Text : "Follow the drinking gourd. That's what I said, friend, follow the drinking gourd." This phrase was used by slaves as a coded message to mean the Big Dipper, which revealed the North Star, and pointed toward freedom.

You might chose to use tasteful humor which relates to the topic as an effective way to attract the audience both to you and the subject at hand.

Example Text : "I'm feeling boxed in." [PAUSE] I'm not sure, but these may have been Henry "Box" Brown's very words after being placed on his head inside a box which measured 3 feet by 2 feet by 2 1\2 feet for what seemed to him like "an hour and a half." He was shipped by Adams Express to freedom in Philadelphia (Brown 60,92; Still 10).

Shocking Statistic

Another possibility to consider is the use of a factual statistic intended to grab your listener's attention. As you research the topic you've picked, keep your eyes open for statistics that will have impact.

Example Text : Today, John Elway's talents are worth millions, but in 1840 the price of a human life, a slave, was worth $1,000.00.

Example Text : Today I'd like to tell you about the Underground Railroad.

In your introduction, you need to adapt your speech to your audience. To keep audience members interested, tell them why your topic is important to them. To accomplish this task, you need to undertake audience analysis prior to creating the speech. Figure out who your audience members are, what things are important to them, what their biases may be, and what types of subjects/issues appeal to them. In the context of this class, some of your audience analysis is provided for you--most of your listeners are college students, so it is likely that they place some value on education, most of them are probably not bathing in money, and they live in Colorado. Consider these traits when you determine how to adapt to your audience.

As you research and write your speech, take note of references to issues that should be important to your audience. Include statements about aspects of your speech that you think will be of special interest to the audience in the introduction. By accomplishing this task, you give your listeners specific things with which they can identify. Audience adaptation will be included throughout the speech, but an effective introduction requires meaningful adaptation of the topic to the audience.

You need to find ways to get the members of your audience involved early in the speech. The following are some possible options to connect your speech to your audience:

Reference to the Occasion

Consider how the occasion itself might present an opportunity to heighten audience receptivity. Remind your listeners of an important date just passed or coming soon.

Example Text : This January will mark the 130th anniversary of a "giant interracial rally" organized by William Still which helped to end streetcar segregation in the city of Philadelphia (Katz i).

Reference to the Previous Speaker

Another possibility is to refer to a previous speaker to capitalize on the good will which already has been established or to build on the information presented.

Example Text : As Alice pointed out last week in her speech on the Olympic games of the ancient world, history can provide us with fascinating lessons.

The credibility statement establishes your qualifications as a speaker. You should come up with reasons why you are someone to listen to on this topic. Why do you have special knowledge or understanding of this topic? What can the audience learn from you that they couldn't learn from someone else? Credibility statements can refer to your extensive research on a topic, your life-long interest in an issue, your personal experience with a thing, or your desire to better the lives of your listeners by sifting through the topic and providing the crucial information.

Remember that Aristotle said that credibility, or ethos, consists of good sense, goodwill, and good moral character. Create the feeling that you possess these qualities by creatively stating that you are well-educated about the topic (good sense), that you want to help each member of the audience (goodwill), and that you are a decent person who can be trusted (good moral character). Once you establish your credibility, the audience is more likely to listen to you as something of an expert and to consider what you say to be the truth. It is often effective to include further references to your credibility throughout the speech by subtly referring to the traits mentioned above.

Show your listeners that you are qualified to speak by making a specific reference to a helpful resource. This is one way to demonstrate competence.

Example Text : In doing research for this topic, I came across an account written by one of these heroes that has deepened my understanding of the institution of slavery. Frederick Douglass', My Bondage and My Freedom, is the account of a man whose master's kindness made his slavery only more unbearable.

Your listeners want to believe that you have their best interests in mind. In the case of an informative speech, it is enough to assure them that this will be an interesting speech and that you, yourself, are enthusiastic about the topic.

Example Text : I hope you'll enjoy hearing about the heroism of the Underground Railroad as much as I have enjoyed preparing for this speech.

Preview the Main Points

The preview informs the audience about the speech's main points. You should preview every main body point and identify each as a separate piece of the body. The purpose of this preview is to let the audience members prepare themselves for the flow of the speech; therefore, you should word the preview clearly and concisely. Attempt to use parallel structure for each part of the preview and avoid delving into the main point; simply tell the audience what the main point will be about in general.

Use the preview to briefly establish your structure and then move on. Let the audience get a taste of how you will divide the topic and fulfill the thesis and then move on. This important tool will reinforce the information in the minds of your listeners. Here are two examples of a preview:

Simply identify the main points of the speech. Cover them in the same order that they will appear in the body of the presentation.

For example, the preview for a speech about kites organized topically might take this form: "First, I will inform you about the invention of the kite. Then, I will explain the evolution of the kite. Third, I will introduce you to the different types of kites. Finally, I will inform you about various uses for kites." Notice that this preview avoids digressions (e.g., listing the various uses for kites); you will take care of the deeper information within the body of the speech.

Example Text : I'll tell you about motivations and means of escape employed by fugitive slaves.

Chronological

For example, the preview for a speech about the Pony Express organized chronologically might take this form: "I'll talk about the Pony Express in three parts. First, its origins, second, its heyday, and third, how it came to an end." Notice that this preview avoids digressions (e.g., listing the reasons why the Pony Express came to an end); you will cover the deeper information within the body of the speech.

Example Text : I'll talk about it in three parts. First, its origins, second, its heyday, and third, how it came to an end.

After you accomplish the first five components of the introduction, you should make a clean transition to the body of the speech. Use this transition to signal a change and prepare the audience to begin processing specific topical information. You should round out the introduction, reinforce the excitement and interest that you created in the audience during the introduction, and slide into the first main body point.

Strategic organization helps increase the clarity and effectiveness of your speech. Four key issues are discussed in this section:

Organizational Patterns

Connective devices, references to outside research.

The body contains the bulk of information in your speech and needs to be clearly organized. Without clear organization, the audience will probably forget your information, main points, perhaps even your thesis. Some simple strategies will help you create a clear, memorable speech. Below are the four key issues used in organizing a speech.

Once you settle on a topic, you should decide which aspects of that topic are of greatest importance for your speech. These aspects become your main points. While there is no rule about how many main points should appear in the body of the speech, most students go with three main points. You must have at least two main points; aside from that rule, you should select your main points based on the importance of the information and the time limitations. Be sure to include whatever information is necessary for the audience to understand your topic. Also, be sure to synthesize the information so it fits into the assigned time frame. As you choose your main points, try to give each point equal attention within the speech. If you pick three main points, each point should take up roughly one-third of the body section of your speech.

There are four basic patterns of organization for an informative speech.

  • Chronological order
  • Spatial order
  • Causal order
  • Topical order

There are four basic patterns of organization for an informative speech. You can choose any of these patterns based on which pattern serves the needs of your speech.

Chronological Order

A speech organized chronologically has main points oriented toward time. For example, a speech about the Farm Aid benefit concert could have main points organized chronologically. The first main point focuses on the creation of the event; the second main point focuses on the planning stages; the third point focuses on the actual performance/concert; and the fourth point focuses on donations and assistance that resulted from the entire process. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that could be followed on a calendar or a clock.

Spatial Order

A speech organized spatially has main points oriented toward space or a directional pattern. The Farm Aid speech's body could be organized in spatial order. The first main point discusses the New York branch of the organization; the second main point discusses the Midwest branch; the third main point discusses the California branch of Farm Aid. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that could be traced on a map.

Causal Order

A speech organized causally has main points oriented toward cause and effect. The main points of a Farm Aid speech organized causally could look like this: the first main point informs about problems on farms and the need for monetary assistance; the second main point discusses the creation and implementation of the Farm Aid program. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that alerts the audience to a problem or circumstance and then tells the audience what action resulted from the original circumstance.

Topical Order

A speech organized topically has main points organized more randomly by sub-topics. The Farm Aid speech could be organized topically: the first main point discusses Farm Aid administrators; the second main point discusses performers; the third main point discusses sponsors; the fourth main point discusses audiences. In this format, you discuss main points in a more random order that labels specific aspects of the topic and addresses them in separate categories. Most speeches that are not organized chronologically, spatially, or causally are organized topically.

Within the body of your speech, you need clear internal structure. Connectives are devices used to create a clear flow between ideas and points within the body of your speech--they serve to tie the speech together. There are four main types of connective devices:

Transitions

Internal previews, internal summaries.

Within the body of your speech, you need clear internal structure. Think of connectives as hooks and ladders for the audience to use when moving from point-to-point within the body of your speech. These devices help re-focus the minds of audience members and remind them of which main point your information is supporting. The four main types of connective devices are:

Transitions are brief statements that tell the audience to shift gears between ideas. Transitions serve as the glue that holds the speech together and allow the audience to predict where the next portion of the speech will go. For example, once you have previewed your main points and you want to move from the introduction to the body of the Farm Aid speech, you might say: "To gain an adequate understanding of the intricacies of this philanthropic group, we need to look at some specific information about Farm Aid. We'll begin by looking at the administrative branch of this massive fund-raising organization."

Internal previews are used to preview the parts of a main point. Internal previews are more focused than, but serve the same purpose as, the preview you will use in the introduction of the speech. For example, you might create an internal preview for the complex main point dealing with Farm Aid performers: "In examining the Farm Aid performers, we must acknowledge the presence of entertainers from different genres of music--country and western, rhythm and blues, rock, and pop." The internal preview provides specific information for the audience if a main point is complex or potentially confusing.

Internal summaries are the reverse of internal previews. Internal summaries restate specific parts of a main point. To internally summarize the main point dealing with Farm Aid performers, you might say: "You now know what types of people perform at the Farm Aid benefit concerts. The entertainers come from a wide range of musical genres--country and western, rhythm and blues, rock, and pop." When using both internal previews and internal summaries, be sure to stylize the language in each so you do not become redundant.

Signposts are brief statements that remind the audience where you are within the speech. If you have a long point, you may want to remind the audience of what main point you are on: "Continuing my discussion of Farm Aid performers . . . "

When organizing the body of your speech, you will integrate several references to your research. The purpose of the informative speech is to allow you and the audience to learn something new about a topic. Additionally, source citations add credibility to your ideas. If you know a lot about rock climbing and you cite several sources who confirm your knowledge, the audience is likely to see you as a credible speaker who provides ample support for ideas.

Without these references, your speech is more like a story or a chance for you to say a few things you know. To complete this assignment satisfactorily, you must use source citations. Consult your textbook and instructor for specific information on how much supporting material you should use and about the appropriate style for source citations.

While the conclusion should be brief and tight, it has a few specific tasks to accomplish:

Re-assert/Reinforce the Thesis

Review the main points, close effectively.

Take a deep breath! If you made it to the conclusion, you are on the brink of finishing. Below are the tasks you should complete in your conclusion:

When making the transition to the conclusion, attempt to make clear distinctions (verbally and nonverbally) that you are now wrapping up the information and providing final comments about the topic. Refer back to the thesis from the introduction with wording that calls the original thesis into memory. Assert that you have accomplished the goals of your thesis statement and create the feeling that audience members who actively considered your information are now equipped with an understanding of your topic. Reinforce whatever mood/tone you chose for the speech and attempt to create a big picture of the speech.

Within the conclusion, re-state the main points of the speech. Since you have used parallel wording for your main points in the introduction and body, don't break that consistency in the conclusion. Frame the review so the audience will be reminded of the preview and the developed discussion of each main point. After the review, you may want to create a statement about why those main points fulfilled the goals of the speech.

Finish strongly. When you close your speech, craft statements that reinforce the message and leave the audience with a clear feeling about what was accomplished with your speech. You might finalize the adaptation by discussing the benefits of listening to the speech and explaining what you think audience members can do with the information.

Remember to maintain an informative tone for this speech. You should not persuade about beliefs or positions; rather, you should persuade the audience that the speech was worthwhile and useful. For greatest effect, create a closing line or paragraph that is artistic and effective. Much like the attention-getter, the closing line needs to be refined and practiced. Your close should stick with the audience and leave them interested in your topic. Take time to work on writing the close well and attempt to memorize it so you can directly address the audience and leave them thinking of you as a well-prepared, confident speaker.

Outlining an Informative Speech

Two types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech. The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech. The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech. In this section, we discuss both types of outlines.

Two types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech. The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech. The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech.

The Complete Sentence Outline

A complete sentence outline may not be required for your presentation. The following information is useful, however, in helping you prepare your speech.

The complete sentence outline helps you organize your material and thoughts and it serves as an excellent copy for editing the speech. The complete sentence outline is just what it sounds like: an outline format including every complete sentence (not fragments or keywords) that will be delivered during your speech.

Writing the Outline

You should create headings for the introduction, body, and conclusion and clearly signal shifts between these main speech parts on the outline. Use standard outline format. For instance, you can use Roman numerals, letters, and numbers to label the parts of the outline. Organize the information so the major headings contain general information and the sub-headings become more specific as they descend. Think of the outline as a funnel: you should make broad, general claims at the top of each part of the outline and then tighten the information until you have exhausted the point. Do this with each section of the outline. Be sure to consult with your instructor about specific aspects of the outline and refer to your course book for further information and examples.

Using the Outline

If you use this outline as it is designed to be used, you will benefit from it. You should start the outline well before your speech day and give yourself plenty of time to revise it. Attempt to have the final, clean copies ready two or three days ahead of time, so you can spend a day or two before your speech working on delivery. Prepare the outline as if it were a final term paper.

The Speaking Outline

Depending upon the assignment and the instructor, you may use a speaking outline during your presentation. The following information will be helpful in preparing your speech through the use of a speaking outline.

This outline should be on notecards and should be a bare bones outline taken from the complete sentence outline. Think of the speaking outline as train tracks to guide you through the speech.

Many speakers find it helpful to highlight certain words/passages or to use different colors for different parts of the speech. You will probably want to write out long or cumbersome quotations along with your source citation. Many times, the hardest passages to learn are those you did not write but were spoken by someone else. Avoid the temptation to over-do the speaking outline; many speakers write too much on the cards and their grades suffer because they read from the cards.

The best strategy for becoming comfortable with a speaking outline is preparation. You should prepare well ahead of time and spend time working with the notecards and memorizing key sections of your speech (the introduction and conclusion, in particular). Try to become comfortable with the extemporaneous style of speaking. You should be able to look at a few keywords on your outline and deliver eloquent sentences because you are so familiar with your material. You should spend approximately 80% of your speech making eye-contact with your audience.

Delivering an Informative Speech

For many speakers, delivery is the most intimidating aspect of public speaking. Although there is no known cure for nervousness, you can make yourself much more comfortable by following a few basic delivery guidelines. In this section, we discuss those guidelines.

The Five-Step Method for Improving Delivery

  • Read aloud your full-sentence outline. Listen to what you are saying and adjust your language to achieve a good, clear, simple sentence structure.
  • Practice the speech repeatedly from the speaking outline. Become comfortable with your keywords to the point that what you say takes the form of an easy, natural conversation.
  • Practice the speech aloud...rehearse it until you are confident you have mastered the ideas you want to present. Do not be concerned about "getting it just right." Once you know the content, you will find the way that is most comfortable for you.
  • Practice in front of a mirror, tape record your practice, and/or present your speech to a friend. You are looking for feedback on rate of delivery, volume, pitch, non-verbal cues (gestures, card-usage, etc.), and eye-contact.
  • Do a dress rehearsal of the speech under conditions as close as possible to those of the actual speech. Practice the speech a day or two before in a classroom. Be sure to incorporate as many elements as possible in the dress rehearsal...especially visual aids.

It should be clear that coping with anxiety over delivering a speech requires significant advanced preparation. The speech needs to be completed several days beforehand so that you can effectively employ this five-step plan.

Anderson, Thad, & Ron Tajchman. (1994). Informative Speaking. Writing@CSU . Colorado State University. https://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=52

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How to Write an Informative Speech

Last Updated: October 6, 2022 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Lynn Kirkham . Lynn Kirkham is a Professional Public Speaker and Founder of Yes You Can Speak, a San Francisco Bay Area-based public speaking educational business empowering thousands of professionals to take command of whatever stage they've been given - from job interviews, boardroom talks to TEDx and large conference platforms. Lynn was chosen as the official TEDx Berkeley speaker coach for the last four years and has worked with executives at Google, Facebook, Intuit, Genentech, Intel, VMware, and others. There are 13 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,378,859 times.

An informative speech tells an audience about a process, event, or concept. Whether you’re explaining how to grow a garden or describing a historical event, writing an informative speech is pretty straightforward. Knowing the topic inside and out is key, so start by conducting thorough research. Organize your speech logically so your audience can easily follow, and keep your language clear. Since speeches are recited out loud, be sure to set aside time after writing to perfect your delivery.

Researching the Topic

Step 1 Choose a subject that interests you if the topic isn’t assigned.

  • Suppose your prompt instructs you to inform the audience about a hobby or activity. Make a list of your clubs, sports, and other activities, and choose the one that interests you most. Then zoom in on one particular aspect or process to focus on in your speech.
  • For instance, if you like tennis, you can’t discuss every aspect of the sport in a single speech. Instead, you could focus on a specific technique, like serving the ball.

Step 2 Gather a variety...

  • For example, if your speech is about a historical event, find primary sources, like letters or newspaper articles published at the time of the event. Additionally, include secondary sources, such as scholarly articles written by experts on the event.
  • If you’re informing the audience about a medical condition, find information in medical encyclopedias, scientific journals, and government health websites.

Tip: Organize your sources in a works cited page. Even if the assignment doesn’t require a works cited page, it’ll help you keep track of your sources. [3] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source

Step 3 Form a clear understanding of the process or concept you’re describing.

  • For instance, if your speech is on growing plants from seeds, explain the process step-by-step to a friend or relative. Ask them if any parts in your explanation seemed muddy or vague.
  • Break down the material into simple terms, especially if you’re addressing a non-expert audience. Think about how you’d describe the topic to a grandparent or younger sibling. If you can’t avoid using jargon, be sure to define technical words in clear, simple terms.

Step 4 Come up with a thesis that concisely presents your speech’s purpose.

  • For example, if your speech is on the poet Charles Baudelaire, a strong thesis would be, “I am here to explain how city life and exotic travel shaped the key poetic themes of Charles Baudelaire’s work.”
  • While the goal of an informative speech isn't to make a defensible claim, your thesis still needs to be specific. For instance, “I’m going to talk about carburetors” is vague. “My purpose today is to explain how to take apart a variable choke carburetor” is more specific.

Step 5 Focus on informing your audience instead of persuading them.

  • For instance, a speech meant to persuade an audience to support a political stance would most likely include examples of pathos, or persuasive devices that appeal to the audience's emotions.
  • On the other hand, an informative speech on how to grow pitcher plants would present clear, objective steps. It wouldn't try to argue that growing pitcher plants is great or persuade listeners to grow pitcher plants.

Drafting Your Speech

Step 1 Write a bare...

  • Delivering memorized remarks instead of reading verbatim is more engaging. A section of a speaking outline would look like this: III. YMCA’s Focus on Healthy Living  A. Commitment to overall health: both body and mind  B. Programs that support commitment   1. Annual Kid’s Day   2. Fitness facilities   3. Classes and group activities

Step 2 Include a hook, thesis, and road map of your speech in the introduction.

  • For example, you could begin with, “Have you ever wondered how a figure skater could possibly jump, twist, and land on the thin blade of an ice skate? From proper technique to the physical forces at play, I’ll explain how world-class skaters achieve jaw-dropping jumps and spins.”
  • Once you've established your purpose, preview your speech: “After describing the basic technical aspects of jumping, I’ll discuss the physics behind jumps and spins. Finally, I’ll explain the 6 types of jumps and clarify why some are more difficult than others.”
  • Some people prefer to write the speech's body before the introduction. For others, writing the intro first helps them figure out how to organize the rest of the speech.

Step 3 Present your main ideas in a logically organized body.

  • For instance, if your speech is about the causes of World War I, start by discussing nationalism in the years prior to the war. Next, describe the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, then explain how alliances pulled the major players into open warfare.
  • Transition smoothly between ideas so your audience can follow your speech. For example, write, “Now that we’ve covered how nationalism set the stage for international conflict, we can examine the event that directly led to the outbreak of World War I: the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. [11] X Research source

Step 4 Review your main points in the conclusion.

  • For instance, your conclusion could point out, “Examining the factors that set the stage for World War I shows how intense nationalism fueled the conflict. A century after the Great War, the struggle between nationalism and globalism continues to define international politics in the twenty-first century.”

Step 5 Write a complete draft to edit and memorize your speech.

  • Typically, speeches aren’t read verbatim. Instead, you’ll memorize the speech and use a bare bones outline to stay on track.

Avoid information overload: When you compose your speech, read out loud as you write. Focus on keeping your sentence structures simple and clear. Your audience will have a hard time following along if your language is too complicated. [14] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source

Perfecting Your Delivery

Step 1 Write the main points and helpful cues on notecards.

  • While it’s generally okay to use slightly different phrasing, try to stick to your complete outline as best you can. If you veer off too much or insert too many additional words, you could end up exceeding your time limit.
  • Keep in mind your speaking outline will help you stay focused. As for quotes and statistics, feel free to write them on your notecards for quick reference.

Memorization tip: Break up the speech into smaller parts, and memorize it section by section. Memorize 1 sentence then, when you feel confident, add the next. Continue practicing with gradually longer passages until you know the speech like the back of your hand.

Step 2 Project confidence with eye contact, gestures, and good posture.

  • Instead of slouching, stand up tall with your shoulders back. In addition to projecting confidence, good posture will help you breathe deeply to support your voice.

Step 3 Practice the speech in a mirror or to a friend.

  • Have them point out any spots that dragged or seemed disorganized. Ask if your tone was engaging, if you used body language effectively, and if your volume, pitch, and pacing need any tweaks.

Step 4 Make sure you stay within the time limit.

  • If you keep exceeding the time limit, review your complete sentence outline. Cut any fluff and simplify complicated phrases. If your speech isn’t long enough, look for areas that could use more detail or consider adding another section to the body.
  • Just make sure any content you add is relevant. For instance, if your speech on nationalism and World War I is 2 minutes too short, you could add a section about how nationalism manifested in specific countries, including Britain, Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Serbia.

Sample Informative Speeches

informative speech outline about health

Expert Q&A

Lynn Kirkham

  • You're probably much better at informative speeches than you think! If you have ever told your parents about your day at school or explained to a friend how to make chicken noodle soup, you already have experience giving an informative speech! Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • If you get nervous, try to relax, take deep breaths, and visualize calming scenery. Remember, there’s nothing to worry about. Just set yourself up for success by knowing the material and practicing. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 0
  • When composing your speech, take your audience into consideration, and tailor your speech to the people you’re addressing. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 1

informative speech outline about health

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  • ↑ https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-realworldcomm/chapter/11-1-informative-speeches/
  • ↑ https://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/a-primer-on-communication-studies/s11-01-informative-speeches.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_works_cited_page_basic_format.html
  • ↑ https://open.lib.umn.edu/communication/chapter/11-1-informative-speeches/
  • ↑ https://www.comm.pitt.edu/informative-speaking
  • ↑ https://rasmussen.libanswers.com/faq/337550
  • ↑ Lynn Kirkham. Public Speaking Coach. Expert Interview. 20 November 2019.
  • ↑ https://www.hamilton.edu/academics/centers/oralcommunication/guides/how-to-outline-a-speech
  • ↑ https://wac.colostate.edu/resources/writing/guides/informative-speaking/
  • ↑ https://www.comm.pitt.edu/structuring-speech
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/speeches/
  • ↑ https://www.speechanddebate.org/wp-content/uploads/High-School-Competition-Events-Guide.pdf
  • ↑ https://open.lib.umn.edu/communication/chapter/10-4-physical-delivery/

About This Article

Lynn Kirkham

To write an informative speech, start with an introduction that will grab your audience's attention and give them an idea of where the rest of your speech is headed. Next, choose 3 important points that you want to make to form the body of your speech. Then, organize the points in a logical order and write content to address each point. Finally, write a conclusion that summarizes the main points and ends with a message that you want your audience to take away from it. For tips on researching topics for an informative speech, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Public Speaking Tips & Speech Topics

89 Medical Speech Topic Ideas [Persuasive, Informative, Nursing]

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Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

Medical speech topic list with public speaking ideas for an informative or persuasive medical text such as speech recognition software, Staphylococcus aureus or self-esteem problems. I have these informative ideas for a public speaking speech in mind for you:

In this article:

Informative

  • Safety and legal issues on acupuncture.
  • Frustrations for color blind people.
  • The benefits of ozone therapy.
  • What is Reiki stress reduction and relaxation?
  • Tip for making up a first aid kit for wilderness expeditions.
  • What is autism?
  • Epidemiological studies on the bird flu.
  • Which home tests are safe and reliable?
  • Facts and myths about Cellulitis.
  • Short-sightedness and long-sightedness explained.
  • Medical speech recognition software developments.
  • Heart attack signs.
  • What health problems with diabetes, how to deal with them?
  • Diagnosing a food allergy, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • How to prevent Lyme disease, spread to humans by infected ticks.
  • A day with the crew of an air ambulance helicopter.
  • Arguments for embryonic stem cell research.
  • How to patent medicine.
  • Philosophies about genetic engineering.
  • Stages of pregnancy month by month.
  • The importance of organ donation.
  • The principles of medical ethics.
  • What do our kidneys do?

Here are some concrete persuasive medical speech topic samples. Keep going back and forth in your mind to sort out the way you like to talk about it.

  • Isolation is the best way to prevent the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA infections.
  • Medical marijuana must be allowed for ill people – or not.
  • Migraine often is misunderstood in the workplace.
  • Most infertile couples use alternative medicine .
  • Mental health issues affect us all in some way.
  • Food allergy can manifest in behavior issues.
  • Stuttering causes self-acceptance and self-esteem problems.
  • The food industry should be blamed for obesity.
  • Tourette’s syndrome patients can’t help it, let’s help them.
  • Alzheimer’s disease should be involved in the care he or she will get.
  • Atkins isn’t a quick fix for weight loss.
  • Solve asthma by improving air quality.
  • Effective medicines aren’t always expensive.
  • Medical speech recognition and pathology experiences.
  • Stopping smoking speeds recovery after operations.
  • How a donation help your local Alzheimer’s charity.
  • Everyone should donate blood.
  • A woman can be too old to give birth.
  • Air ambulance helicopters are the most efficient way to help victims of road accidents.
  • Back pain is caused by a spinal disk problem.
  • Beauty is not a valid reason to pursue cosmetic plastic surgery.
  • Brushing your teeth twice a day will not keep the dentist away.
  • Cell phones have a dangerous amount of radiation.
  • Children should be first on organ transplant lists.
  • Computer use is the reason for those repetitive strain injuries.
  • Do not be afraid of biotechnology developments.
  • Everyone needs dentistry insurance.
  • Everybody should be an organ donor.
  • Food allergy is a disease.
  • Human fetal tissue research will help patients suffering from Alzheimer disease.
  • Medication for general use should not be protected for 20 years.
  • Needle exchange programs help to prevent the widespread of blood-borne viruses.
  • Newborns without brains should not be used as organ donors.
  • Nutrition patterns will change the human DNA genome structure.
  • Patients should never accept money from the pharmaceutical industry.
  • Pharmaceuticals are not transparent.
  • Techniques and methods for transgenderation need to be assessed better.
  • Terminally ill patients should freely rely on a hospital hospice program.
  • The birth control pill is not safe.
  • The E Coli bacteria is not explained properly enough.
  • The morning-after pill must be freely prescribed in drugstores and pharmacies.
  • The Morning-After Pill must be made available without a prescription.
  • Using a known sperm donor is too risky.
  • War veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress are not treated in time.

Of course these statements for a medical speech are not my opinion, but examples to trigger your mind for finding your own medical speech topic. Let these ideas form a rough outline in your head.

In other articles and entirely new threads I have written detailed tips to convert them into a real public speaking presentation.

Tip: A good topic title is short and sharp, conveys and channels a clear message, is easy to remember for the listeners, has no like or equal, is descriptive, and contains your own personal speaking signature.

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6 Additional Medical Persuasive Speech Topic Ideas

Medical persuasive speech topic ideas based on official position statements of organizations in the field, they are perfect for building speech topics in public speaking education. I scraped the net and found mission and vision claims that could be transformed into an issue for speechwriting purposes:

Sun Damage – ‘In most situations, sun protection to prevent skin cancer and sun damage to the skin is required during times when the ultraviolet index (UVI)A is raised’. According to the dermatology resource DermNet NZ. Offer pros and cons, and offer tips for listeners.

Dentistry – ‘The ADA Council on Scientific Affairs continues to believe that amalgam is a valuable, viable and safe choice for dental patients.’ Do you agree with the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs? Or not? Try to find persuasive arguments to adstruct the opposite, or weaken this firm medical persuasive speech topic ideas a little bit.

Nutrition – ‘In overweight and obese insulin-resistant individuals, modest weight loss has been shown to improve insulin resistance. Thus, weight loss is recommended for all such individuals who have or are at risk for diabetes.’ The American Diabetes Association writes on its site. Examine and prove direct relations between overweight and diabetes in a persuasion way of talking. Weight loss and diabetes in itself are great medical persuasive speech topic ideas.

Revalidation – ‘In the United Kingdom doctors will need to be revalidated every five years in order to retain their licence to practise.’ A citation of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Good idea? Take a stand and convince your audience.

Equity – ‘A greater equity in health should be a progress indicator of populations within and between countries.’ That’s a formal statement of WHO World Health Organization. Do yo agree? Construct the arguments of this thesis.

Surgery – ‘Pregnant women should be given the right to choose major abdominal surgery (cesarean section) or a normal birth.’ That is the opinion of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Judge pros and cons, convince your public as speaker in all ways. Good idea for an essay too!

Speech topics related to nursing, mental and travel health careh, and dietary counseling on primary care fostering for high school.

Many, especially female students, like to choose to prepare informative public speaking on an assistant to doctors related issue.

Here are twenty sample speech ideas, divided in specific central ideas and more general writing topics.

  • How to help patients with self-care products.
  • Medical treatment is not available to most people in the world.
  • Involve a nurse in developing mental health policies.
  • What community nurses can do for the health of the neigbourhood.
  • Nursing is also an important provider of mental treatment in complex situations.
  • Care in humanitarian disaster areas.
  • Alzheimers and family relations.
  • Travel health care services.
  • The rights of mentally ill persons.
  • Adolescents with disorders of development.
  • Disabled children and their special needs.
  • Neonatal care for premature babies.
  • Benefits of nursery to the health system.
  • Pediatric oncology for children with cancer.
  • Dietary counseling for babies and their mothers.
  • The altering role of male nurses in the past decades.
  • What does the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners do
  • The romantic history of Florence Nightingale.
  • What education is needed to work in the healthcare business
  • Medical ethics explained.
  • The road to becoming a nurse.
  • Please move your patients the right way!

66 Military Speech Topics [Persuasive, Informative]

259 Interesting Speech Topics [Examples + Outlines]

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How to Write an Informative Speech Outline: A Step-by-Step Guide

informative speech outline about health

It’s the moment of truth — the anxiety-inducing moment when you realize writing the outline for your informative speech is due soon. Whether you’re looking to deliver a report on the migratory patterns of the great white stork or give a lecture on the proper techniques of candle making, knowing how to write an effective outline is essential.

That’s why we’ve put together this complete, step-by-step guide on how to write an informative speech outline. From selecting a topic to transitioning during your speech, this guide will have you well on your way to writing a compelling informative speech outline . So grab your pen and paper, put on your thinking cap, and let’s get started!

What is an Informative Speech Outline?

An informative speech outline is a document used to plan the structure and core content of a public speech. It’s used by speakers to ensure their talk covers all the important points, stays on-topic and flows logically from one point to another. By breaking down complex topics into smaller, concise sections, an effective outline can help keep a speaker organized, set objectives for their talk, support key points with evidence and promote audience engagement. A well-structured outline can also make a presentation easier to remember and act as an invaluable reminder if nerves ever get the better of the speaker. On one hand, an informative speech outline enables speakers to cover multiple ideas in an efficient manner while avoiding digressions. On the other hand, it’s important that speakers remain flexible to adjust and adapt content to meet audience needs. While there are some tried-and-tested strategies for creating outlines that work, many successful speakers prefer to tweak and modify existing outlines according to their personal preferences. In conclusion, preparing an informative speech outline can boost confidence and create an effective structure for presentations. With this in mind, let’s now look at how to structure an informative speech outline

How to Structure an Informative Speech Outline

The structure of your informative speech outline should be based on the points you need to cover during your presentation. It should list out all of the main points in an organized and logical manner, along with supporting details for each point. The main structure for an informative speech should consist of three parts: the introduction, body and conclusion.

Introduction

When starting to craft your structure, begin by introducing the topic and giving a brief synopsis of what the audience can expect to learn from your speech. By setting up what they will gain from your presentation, it will help keep them engaged throughout the rest of your talk. Additionally, include any objectives that you want to achieve by the end of your speech.

The body of an informative speech outline typically consists of three parts: main points, sub-points, and supporting details. Main points are the core topics that the speaker wishes to cover throughout the speech. These can be further broken down into sub-points, that explore the main ideas in greater detail. Supporting details provide evidence or facts about each point and can include statistics, research studies, quotes from experts, anecdotes and personal stories . When presenting an informative speech, it is important to consider each side of the topic for an even-handed discussion. If there is an argumentative element to the speech, consider incorporating both sides of the debate . It is also important to be objective when presenting facts and leave value judgments out. Once you have determined your main points and all of their supporting details, you can start ordering them in a logical fashion. The presentation should have a clear flow and move between points smoothly. Each point should be covered thoroughly without getting overly verbose; you want to make sure you are giving enough information to your audience while still being concise with your delivery.

Writing an informative speech outline can be a daunting yet rewarding process. Through the steps outlined above, speakers will have created a strong foundation for their speech and can now confidently start to research their topics . The outline serves as a guiding map for speakers to follow during their research and when writing their eventual speech drafts . Having the process of developing an informative speech broken down into easy and manageable steps helps to reduce stress and anxiety associated with preparing speeches .

  • The introduction should be around 10-20% of the total speech duration and is designed to capture the audience’s attention and introduce the topic.
  • The main points should make up 40-60% of the speech and provide further detail into the topic. The body should begin with a transition, include evidence or examples and have supporting details. Concluding with a recap or takeaway should take around 10-20% of the speech duration.

While crafting an informative speech outline is a necessary step in order for your presentation to run smoothly, there are many different styles and approaches you can use when creating one. Ultimately though, the goal is always to ensure that the information presented is factual and relevant to both you and your audience. By carefully designing and structuring an effective outline, both you and your audience will be sure to benefit greatly from it when it comes time for delivering a successful presentation .

Now that speakers know how to create an effective outline, it’s time to begin researching the content they plan to include in their speeches. In the next section we’ll discuss how to conduct research for an informative speech so speakers are armed with all the facts necessary to deliver an interesting and engaging presentation .

How to Research for an Informative Speech

When researching an informative speech, it’s important to find valid and reliable sources of information. There are many ways that one can seek out research for an informative speech, and no single method will guarantee a thorough reliable research. Depending on the complexity of the topic and the depth of knowledge required, a variety of methods should be utilized. The first step when researching for an informative speech should be to evaluate your present knowledge of the subject. This will help to determine what specific areas require additional research, and give clues as to where you might start looking for evidence. It is important to know the basic perspectives and arguments surrounding your chosen topic in order to select good sources and avoid biased materials. Textbooks, academic journals, newspaper articles, broadcasts, or credible websites are good starting points for informational speeches. As you search for information and evidence, be sure to use trustworthy authors who cite their sources. These sources refer to experts in the field whose opinions add credibility and can bolster your argument with facts and data. Evaluating these sources is particularly important as they form the foundation of your speech content and structure. Analyze each source critically by looking into who wrote it and evaluating how recent or relevant it is to the current conversation on your chosen topic. As with any research paper, one must strive for accuracy when gathering evidence while also surveying alternative positions on a topic. Considering both sides of a debate allows your speech to provide accurate information while remaining objective. This will also encourage audience members to draw their conclusions instead of taking your word for it. Furthermore, verifying sources from multiple angles (multiple avenues) ensures that information is fact-checked versus opinionated or biased pieces which might distort accuracy or mislead an audience member seeking truth about a controversial issue. At this stage in preparing for an informative speech, research should have been carried out thoroughly enough to allow confidently delivering evidence-based statements about a chosen topic. With all of this necessary groundwork completed, it’s time to move onto the next stage: sourcing different types of evidence which will allow you to illustrate your point in an even more helpful way. It is now time to transition into discussing “Sources & Evidence”.

Sources and Evidence

When crafting an informative speech outline, it is important to include accurate sources and valid evidence. Your audience needs to be sure that the content you are presenting not only reflects a clear understanding of the topic but is also backed up with reliable sources. For example, if you are speaking about climate change, include research studies, statistics, surveys and other forms of data that provide concrete evidence that supports your argument or position. Additionally, be sure to cite any sources used in the speech so that your audience can double-check the accuracy. In some cases, particularly when discussing sensitive topics, each side of the issue should be addressed. Not only does this make for a more balanced discussion, it also allows you to show respect for different points of view without compromising your own opinion or position. Presenting both sides briefly will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter and show your ability to present a well-rounded argument. Knowing how to source accurately and objectively is key to creating an informative speech outline which will be compelling and engaging for an audience. With the right sources and evidence utilized correctly, you can ensure that your argument is both authoritative and convincing. With these fundamentals in place, you can move on to developing tips for crafting an informative speech for maximum impact and engagement with the listeners.

Tips for Crafting an Informative Speech

When crafting an informative speech, there are certain tips and tricks that you can use to make sure your outline is the best it can be. Firstly, if you are speaking about a controversial issue, make sure you present both sides of the argument in an unbiased manner. Rely on researching credible sources, and discuss different points of views objectively. Additionally, organize and prioritize your points so that they are easy to follow and follow a logical progression. Begin with introducing a succinct thesis statement that briefly summarizes the main points of your speech. This will give the audience a clear idea of what topics you will be discussing and help retain their attention throughout your speech. Furthermore, be mindful to weave in personal anecdotes or relevant stories so that the audience can better relate to your ideas. Make sure the anecdotes have a purpose and demonstrate the key themes effectively. Acquiring creative ways to present data or statistics is also important; avoid inundating the audience with too many facts and figures all at once. Finally, ensure that all visual aids such as props, charts or slides remain relevant to the subject matter being discussed. Visual aids not only keep listeners engaged but also make difficult concepts easier to understand. With these handy tips in mind, you should be well on your way to constructing an effective informative speech outline! Now let’s move onto exploring some examples of effective informative speech outlines so that we can get a better idea of how it’s done.

Examples of Effective Informative Speech Outlines

Informative speeches must be compelling and provide relevant details, making them effective and impactful. In order to create an effective outline, speakers must first conduct extensive research on the chosen topic. An effective informative speech outline will clearly provide the audience with enough information to keep them engaged while also adhering to a specific timeframe. The following are examples of how to effectively organize an informative speech: I. Introduction: A. Stimulate their interest – pose a question, present intriguing facts or establish a humorous story B. Clearly state the main focus of the speech C. Establish your credibility– explain your experience/research conducted for the speech II. Supporting Points: A. Each point should contain facts and statistics related to your main idea B. Each point should have its own solid evidence that supports it III. Conclusion: A. Summarize supporting points B. Revisit your introduction point and explain how it’s been updated/changed through the course of the discussion C. Offer a final statement or call to action IV. Bibliography: A. Cite all sources used in creating the speech (provide an alphabetical list) Debate both sides of argument if applicable: N/A

Commonly Asked Questions

What techniques can i use to ensure my informative speech outline is organized and cohesive.

When crafting an informative speech outline, there are several techniques you can use to ensure your speech is organized and cohesive. First of all, make sure your speech follows a logical flow by using signposting , outlining the main ideas at the beginning of the speech and then bulleting out your supporting points. Additionally, you can use transitions throughout the speech to create a smooth order for your thoughts, such as ‘next’ and ‘finally’. Furthermore, it is important that each point in your outline has a specific purpose or goal, to avoid rambling and confusion. Finally, use visual aids such as charts and diagrams to emphasise key ideas and add clarity and structure to your speech. By following these techniques , you can ensure your informative speech outline is well organized and easy to follow.

How should I structure the order of the information in an informative speech outline?

The structure of an informative speech outline should be simple and organized, following a linear step-by-step process. First, you should introduce the topic to your audience and provide an overview of the main points. Next, give an explanation of each point, offer evidence or examples to support it, and explain how it relates to the overall subject matter. Finally, you should conclude with a summary of the main points and a call for action. When structuring the order of information in an informative speech outline, it is important to keep topics distinct from one another and stick to the logical progression that you have established in your introduction. Additionally, pay attention to chronology if appropriate; when discussing historical events, for example, make sure that they are presented in the correct order. Moreover, use transition phrases throughout your outline to help move ideas along smoothly. Finally, utilize both verbal and visual aids such as diagrams or graphics to illustrate complex knowledge effectively and engage your audience throughout your presentation.

What are the essential components of an informative speech outline?

The essential components of an informative speech outline are the introduction, body, and conclusion. Introduction: The introduction should establish the topic of your speech, provide background information, and lead into the main purpose of your speech. It’s also important to include a strong attention-grabbing hook in order to grab the audience’s attention. Body: The body is where you expand on the main points that were outlined in the introduction. It should provide evidence and arguments to support these points, as well as explain any counterarguments that might be relevant. Additionally, it should answer any questions or objections your audience may have about the topic. Conclusion: The conclusion should restate the purpose of your speech and summarize the main points from the body of your speech. It should also leave your audience feeling inspired and motivated to take some kind of action after hearing your speech. In short, an effective informative speech outline should strongly focus on bringing all of these elements together in a cohesive structure to ensure that you deliver an engaging presentation that educates and informs your audience.

Informative Speeches — Types, Topics, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is an informative speech?

An informative speech uses descriptions, demonstrations, and strong detail to explain a person, place, or subject. An informative speech makes a complex topic easier to understand and focuses on delivering information, rather than providing a persuasive argument.

informative speech outline about health

Types of informative speeches

The most common types of informative speeches are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration.

Types of informative speeches

A definition speech explains a concept, theory, or philosophy about which the audience knows little. The purpose of the speech is to inform the audience so they understand the main aspects of the subject matter.

An explanatory speech presents information on the state of a given topic. The purpose is to provide a specific viewpoint on the chosen subject. Speakers typically incorporate a visual of data and/or statistics.

The speaker of a descriptive speech provides audiences with a detailed and vivid description of an activity, person, place, or object using elaborate imagery to make the subject matter memorable.

A demonstrative speech explains how to perform a particular task or carry out a process. These speeches often demonstrate the following:

How to do something

How to make something

How to fix something

How something works

Demonstrative speeches

How to write an informative speech

Regardless of the type, every informative speech should include an introduction, a hook, background information, a thesis, the main points, and a conclusion.

Introduction

An attention grabber or hook draws in the audience and sets the tone for the speech. The technique the speaker uses should reflect the subject matter in some way (i.e., if the topic is serious in nature, do not open with a joke). Therefore, when choosing an attention grabber, consider the following:

What’s the topic of the speech?

What’s the occasion?

Who’s the audience?

What’s the purpose of the speech?

Attention grabbers/hooks

Common Attention Grabbers (Hooks)

Ask a question that allows the audience to respond in a non-verbal way (e.g., a poll question where they can simply raise their hands) or ask a rhetorical question that makes the audience think of the topic in a certain way yet requires no response.

Incorporate a well-known quote that introduces the topic. Using the words of a celebrated individual gives credibility and authority to the information in the speech.

Offer a startling statement or information about the topic, which is typically done using data or statistics. The statement should surprise the audience in some way.

Provide a brief anecdote that relates to the topic in some way.

Present a “what if” scenario that connects to the subject matter of the speech.

Identify the importance of the speech’s topic.

Starting a speech with a humorous statement often makes the audience more comfortable with the speaker.

Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the audience needs to know to understand the speech in its entirety.

The thesis statement shares the central purpose of the speech.

Demonstrate

Include background information and a thesis statement

Preview the main ideas that will help accomplish the central purpose. Typically, informational speeches will have an average of three main ideas.

Body paragraphs

Apply the following to each main idea (body) :

Identify the main idea ( NOTE: The main points of a demonstration speech would be the individual steps.)

Provide evidence to support the main idea

Explain how the evidence supports the main idea/central purpose

Transition to the next main idea

Body of an informative speech

Review or restate the thesis and the main points presented throughout the speech.

Much like the attention grabber, the closing statement should interest the audience. Some of the more common techniques include a challenge, a rhetorical question, or restating relevant information:

Provide the audience with a challenge or call to action to apply the presented information to real life.

Detail the benefit of the information.

Close with an anecdote or brief story that illustrates the main points.

Leave the audience with a rhetorical question to ponder after the speech has concluded.

Detail the relevance of the presented information.

Informative speech conclusion

Before speech writing, brainstorm a list of informative speech topic ideas. The right topic depends on the type of speech, but good topics can range from video games to disabilities and electric cars to healthcare and mental health.

Informative speech topics

Some common informative essay topics for each type of informational speech include the following:

Informative speech examples

The following list identifies famous informational speeches:

“Duties of American Citizenship” by Theodore Roosevelt

“Duty, Honor, Country” by General Douglas MacArthur

“Strength and Dignity” by Theodore Roosevelt

Explanation

“Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” by Patrick Henry

“The Decision to Go to the Moon” by John F. Kennedy

“We Shall Fight on the Beaches” by Winston Churchill

Description

“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Pearl Harbor Address” by Franklin Delano Roosevelt

“Luckiest Man” by Lou Gehrig

Demonstration

The Way to Cook with Julia Child

This Old House with Bob Vila

Bill Nye the Science Guy with Bill Nye

The Hammurabi Code Comprehensive Nursing Paper Sample

200+ Best Persuasive & Informative Speech Topics about Health

Avatar of Dennis

This covers a lists of more than 200 Persuasive & Informative Speech Topics about Health.

When brainstorming a Persuasive or Informative Health Speech topic, consider several factors, including but not limited to how comfortable and enthralled you are writing about the subject. Select topics that address your personal experiences as well as common healthcare issues that interest you.

Thorough and comprehensive research is essential for making the essay stand out.

Approach the essay from the reader’s point of view in order to write an argument or discussion that will appeal to them.

If you don’t want to face challenges in providing quality and premium written pieces, look for a subject that is fun and easy to address.

The issue you choose to address is unimportant as long as you have enough information to write a speech that meets the required word count.

Here are some topics that students of all academic levels can use to write reader-centered and interesting health speeches.

You can also check out Guide to Writing Best Informative Essay Outline

Top Informative Speech Topics about Health

  • The best and worst abdominal exercises in a gym.
  • The body’s coping mechanisms when in a state of shock.
  • Managing and controlling type 2 diabetes.
  • How our culture affects organ donation.
  • Simple AIDS prevention tips.
  • How celiac disease affects our world.
  • The benefits of walking without shoes.
  • How smoking is harmful to your health.
  • The benefits of being an organ donor.
  • The dangers of texting while driving.
  • The importance of vitamins and minerals.
  • The nutritional value of pickles.
  • The importance of wearing your seatbelt.
  • The effects of caffeine on the body.
  • The history of Psychology.
  • Exercise combats health problems.
  • High-risk pregnancy complications.
  • What is narcissistic personality disorder?
  • The effects of fast food on the body.
  • How Monsanto affects our food.
  • How the American diet has changed.
  • The health benefits of dark chocolate.
  • Plastic surgery is bad for your skin.
  • The importance of anxiety and depression awareness.
  • The benefits of regular exercise.
  • How the circulatory system works.
  • How to have a healthy pregnancy.
  • How to get a really good sleep.
  • Why the brain is so important.
  • The effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
  • Calcium is important
  • Eating disorders in modern times.
  • Herbal remedies that work for common diseases.
  • Junk food and its relation to obesity.
  • Obesity is the next health risk for the western world.
  • Smoking bans and restrictions don’t work.
  • Stretching exercises at the start of your day prevent injuries.
  • The influenza vaccination effectiveness is poor.
  • The losing battle with alcohol abuse.
  • The necessity of mandatory HIV/AIDS testing
  • The need for mandatory drug testing in our society.
  • Advantages and disadvantages of aqua aerobics for your muscles.
  • How to determine your body fat percentage in three steps, and when are you in
  • The effects of dietary health supplements on the long run are not certain.
  • Increasing weight leads to increasing condition and risks.
  • Why performance-enhancing substances such as steroids are banned in sports.
  • Natural bodybuilding supplements and their benefits for normal athletes.
  • Different types of Calisthenics exercises on music beats.
  • Why do people apply to life extension nutrition – there is no life elixir or cocktail?
  • Disadvantages of raw food diets – the flip-side topics to talk about are the
  • Different methods of strength training programs for revalidating patients. Ideas for informative speech topics on fitness:
  • Choosing a gym in your town, what to think of, get them a generic checklist.
  • Workout myths and lies.
  • The history of the Pilates system that was very popular in the nineties.
  • Time-saving fitness training tips for busy persons.
  • Ways to prepare for the types of physical tests, e.g. the Bruce, Beep.
  • Designating a personal trainer helps you to keep on coming to the athletic club.
  • Cardiovascular exercises that really work.
  • Top stretching and warm up tips.
  • Big three men’s salubriousness issues.
  • How to get rid of blubbering cellulite adipose tissue on your waist.
  • Comfortable workout clothing and activewear for women.
  • What is spinning?
  • Tips to stay motivated to go to the gym two or three times a week.
  • Benefits of yoga workout routines.
  • Back pain exercises to stretch and strengthen your back and supporting muscles.
  • Different low-carb diets.
  • Top five sunburn blocking tips, and do share your own wisdom, and empiricism
  • Travel tips for a healthy vacation.
  • How our immune system works to keep you physically strong and capable.
  • Yoga diet and yogic meditation techniques.
  • Strange Allergies and their symptoms and effects.
  • Multiple Sclerosis symptoms, causes, treatment and life expectancy.
  • Asthma solutions and natural remedies.
  • Dental care how to prevent tooth decay.
  • Stress management – reduce, prevent and cope with stress.
  • Yoga tips for beginners and starters – ideal to demonstrate some postures.
  • Why taking a vacation is good for your health.
  • The effects of eating disorders.
  • What is Down syndrome?
  • Alcohol addicts need help, but they are shy to say it
  • Are animal-human transplants save lives?
  • The need for farmers to go organic
  • The use of e-cigarettes is a safe way to enable addicts to quit smoking
  • Vaporizers have side effects and should be avoided
  • The importance of yoga workout routines
  • How to deal with a kid suffering from autism/
  • The need for the supply of birth control pills to increase
  • The first six months of breastfeeding should be made mandatory
  • Cellphones have adverse effects on our health
  • The best way to dress for workouts
  • Tobacco chewing is a dangerous habit that should be discouraged
  • Condoms are a necessary protective measure against early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases
  • The checklist for selecting the best gym in town
  • The checklist to preventing tooth decay
  • CPR should be a mandatory subject in academic levels
  • Meat is health but eating it daily is bad for your health
  • Euthanasia as a safe way to lower the rates of suicidal cases
  • Fire awareness and preparedness techniques
  • Herbal medicines highly recommended for treating different conditions
  • Proper nutrition is the natural treatment for hair loss in humans
  • Mindfulness for managing stress and depression
  • Natural ways to prevent hangovers
  • Quality and quantity sleep to boost performance at work
  • Are fast foods junk food, and how to minimize intake?
  • Simple yet effective ways to prevent aids
  • Soft drugs aren’t as soft as seem
  • The benefits of slim and black tea
  • Effects of Excessive consumption of black tea
  • Avocados have many health benefits
  • The many health benefits of medical marijuana
  • Extreme levels of salt in food can be harmful to your health
  • What is the Paleo diet and its benefits?
  • Fitness training tips that could save you time
  • Easy tips to keep you motivated to accomplish your health goals

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Informative Speech Topics about Health

Top Persuasive Speech Topics about Health

  • Isolation is the best way to prevent the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA infections.
  • Medical marijuana must be allowed for ill people – or not.
  • Migraine often is misunderstood in the workplace.
  • Mental health issues affect us all in some way.
  • Food allergy can manifest in behavior issues.
  • Stuttering causes self-acceptance and self-esteem problems.
  • The food industry should be blamed for obesity.
  • Tourette’s syndrome patients can’t help it, let’s help them.
  • Alzheimer’s disease should be involved in the care he or she will get.
  • Atkins isn’t a quick fix for weight loss.
  • Solve asthma by improving air quality.
  • Effective medicines aren’t always expensive.
  • Medical speech recognition and pathology experiences.
  • Stopping smoking speeds recovery after operations.
  • Everyone should donate blood.
  • A woman can be too old to give birth.
  • Air ambulance helicopters are the most efficient way to help victims of road accidents.
  • Back pain is caused by a spinal disk problem.
  • Beauty is not a valid reason to pursue cosmetic plastic surgery.
  • Brushing your teeth twice a day will not keep the dentist away.
  • Cell phones have a dangerous amount of radiation.
  • Children should be first on organ transplant lists.
  • Computer use is the reason for those repetitive strain injuries.
  • Do not be afraid of biotechnology developments.
  • Everyone needs dentistry insurance.
  • Everybody should be an organ donor.
  • Human fetal tissue research will help patients suffering from Alzheimer disease.
  • Medication for general use should not be protected for 20 years.
  • Needle exchange programs help to prevent the widespread of blood-borne viruses.
  • Newborns without brains should not be used as organ donors.
  • Nutrition patterns will change the human DNA genome structure.
  • Patients should never accept money from the pharmaceutical industry.
  • Pharmaceuticals are not transparent.
  • Techniques and methods for transgenderation need to be assessed better.
  • Terminally ill patients should freely rely on a hospital hospice program.
  • The birth control pill is not safe.
  • The E Coli bacteria is not explained properly enough.
  • The morning-after pill must be freely prescribed in drugstores and pharmacies.
  • The Morning-After Pill must be made available without a prescription.
  • Using a known sperm donor is too risky.
  • Most infertile couples use alternative medicine .
  • How a donation help your local Alzheimer’s charity.
  • Food allergy is a disease.
  • War veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress are not treated in time.

You can also check out Creative Topics for Narrative Writing / Essays

Related FAQs

1. what is an informative speech topic.

An informative speech is one that provides information and educates the audience on a specific topic. An informative speech should help your audience learn, understand, and remember information you are presenting. How do you choose an informative speech topic?

2. How long should an informative speech be?

Mind your volume. Mostly your informative speech should take no longer than 5 to 7 minutes, so picking vast topics would be illogical. You won’t cover all the necessary information within such a tight deadline.

3. What is the difference between persuasive speech and informative speech?

Persuasive speeches are intended for persuading your audience and informing them on a particular topic or idea. Informative speeches, however, focus more on providing information without any intention of persuasion whatsoever… Provide examples from the real world so that your audience can relate to your topic of the speech on a practical basis.

4. Why do informative speeches become boring?

Informative speeches can easily become boring for an audience for several reasons. First, the speaker should be sure not to present a topic which is already well known, or the audience will quickly lose interest. The topic should be something the audience has never encountered, or at least include new and exciting information on a familiar topic.

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Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate Essay (Speech)

Thesis statement, central idea, main points, developing main points, review of main points, closing statement.

To inform the audience about the advantages of consuming dark chocolate.

Whereas chocolate is high in milk and fat, dark chocolate has a number of health benefits for consumers.

Eating dark chocolate is good for individuals with cardiovascular disease and excessive weight.

There are many products the effect of which on people’s health is considered controversial. Chocolate is one of such food items, which is believed to have many negative health outcomes by some and to possess positive features by others. While much can be argued about chocolate in general, dark chocolate has more benefits than disadvantages to people’s health. Specifically, its positive effects have been found in the spheres of cardiovascular health and food intake attenuation. Therefore, while chocolate is high in milk and fat, dark chocolate is not high in these elements but instead, it is rich in useful ingredients that can enhance people’s health.

  • Dark chocolate is rather different from milk or white chocolate.
  • Dark chocolate has considerable cardiovascular benefits.
  • Dark chocolate plays an important role in weakening subsequent food intake.
  • Dark, milk, and white chocolate contain different proportions of cocoa, milk, and milk butter (Marsh, Green, Naylor, & Guelfi, 2017). Out of these three types, dark chocolate has the highest level of cocoa and the lowest levels of milk and cocoa butter. Hence, it is the most useful to consume and not worry about excessive weight.
  • Cardiovascular benefits of dark chocolate include elevated platelet aggregation, improved blood pressure, and enhanced endothelial function (Kerimi & Williamson, 2015). Furthermore, dark chocolate has been proved to embellish nitric oxide bioavailability and promote mitochondrial structure and function (Higginbotham & Taub, 2015).
  • Dark chocolate diminishes the desire to eat compared to white and milk chocolate (Marsh et al., 2017).
  • What are the differences between various types of chocolate?
  • What cardiovascular benefits does dark chocolate have?
  • How does dark chocolate affect food intake?

Dark chocolate offers a number of health benefits to people.

Higginbotham, E., & Taub, P. R. (2015). Cardiovascular benefits of dark chocolate? Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine, 17 (12), 54.

Kerimi, A., & Williamson, G. (2015). The cardiovascular benefits of dark chocolate. Vascular Pharmacology, 71 , 11-15.

Marsh, C. E., Green, D. J., Naylor, L. H., & Guelfi, K. J. (2017). Consumption of dark chocolate attenuates subsequent food intake compared with milk and white chocolate in postmenopausal women. Appetite, 116 , 544-551.

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  • Health Benefits of Cocoa
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  • Cocoa Production and Its Environmental Performance
  • The Main Reasons for Stop Buying Cocoa
  • Cocoa Production: Analysis and Traceability
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Medical Topics for Informative Speech

Medical Topics for Informative Speech

Medical Topics for Informative Speech: There are times as a medical student you are given assignments on informative medical topics.

When given a certain topic to write about, you might lack words on informative medical speech topics. The important thing in this kind of essay is to choose a researchable topic that you prefer. Come up with good introduction, facts, and adequate information, then conclude the whole topic accordingly.

Below are informative medical speech topics that will give you a rough idea of what topic to choose based on your r interest.

1. A day with the crew of an air ambulance helicopter.

2. Arguments for embryonic stem cell research.

3. Can a person live normally without a certain part of the brain?

4. Diagnosing a food allergy, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

5. Does a man’s brain differ from a woman’s?

6. Epidemiological studies on the bird flu.

7. Facts and myths about Cellulitis.

Read: Medical Persuasive Speech Topics

8. Frustrations for color blind people.

9. Heart attack signs.

10. How can listening to music affect your brain in a positive way?

11. How does makeup affect the skin?

12. How much water does the human body need?

13. How to ensure safe sleep for infants?

14. How to patent medicine.

15. How to prevent Lyme disease, spread to humans by infected ticks.

16. Is being vegetarian bad for your health?

17. Is dividing people into left-brained and right-brained categories valid?

18. Is eating organic food necessary for our well-being?

19. Medical speech recognition software developments.

20. Philosophies about genetic engineering.

21. Safety and legal issues on acupuncture.

22. Short-sightedness and long-sightedness explained.

23. Should physician-assisted suicide be legalized?

24. Stages of pregnancy month by month.

Read Also: Health Related Informative Speech Topics

Medical Informative Speech Topics

1. The benefits of ozone therapy.

2. The importance of organ donation.

3. The principles of medical ethics.

4. Tip for making up a first aid kit for wilderness expeditions.

5. What can cause memory loss?

6. What do our kidneys do?

7. What health problems with diabetes, how to deal with them?

8. What impact does birth control have on a woman’s body?

9. What is autism?

Read: Medical Debate Topics   

10. What is medicinal marijuana, and how does it affect our body?

11. What is Reiki stress reduction and relaxation?

12. What is the worst profession in terms of health?

13. What mental illnesses can’t be healed, and why?

14. What physical benefits does laughter have?

15. What psychological problems do ER workers face?

16. What was the first case of plastic surgery?

17. Which home tests are safe and reliable?

18. Why are medicines from nature not always appropriate?

19. Why is social media harmful to mental health?

Read:  Medical Compare and Contrast Essay Topics

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COMMENTS

  1. 258 Speech Topics on Health [Persuasive, Informative, Argumentative]

    Persuasive Informative Argumentative Persuasive Wearing pajamas in bed is good for your health. Diet beverages are often not diet at all and regular not quite regular. Going barefoot in the summer time - yep, wearing no shoes - is healthy for your feet. Take a test to see if you are at risk for any dangerous disease or virus.

  2. Mental Health Informative Speech Topics

    1. The Importance of Mental Health 2. The Different Types of Mental Illness 3. The Causes of Mental Illness 4. The Symptoms of Mental Illness 5. The Treatments for Mental Illness 6. The Impact of Mental Illness on Society 7. The Stigma Associated with Mental Illness 8. How to Help Someone with Mental Illness 9. mental Health in the Workplace

  3. PDF Informative Speech Outline Example

    Informative Speech Outline Example - Eating Healthily With A Busy Lifestyle Purpose: To inform the audience how to eat healthily on the run Introduction: How many of you want to be healthy?

  4. 43 Informative Speech Outline Templates & Examples

    3.3 Explanatory Speech. 3.4 Demonstration Speech. 4 Informative Speech Outline Templates. 5 Checklist for Your Informative Speech. 5.1 Eye Contact. 5.2 Tone of Your Voice. 5.3 Expressive Hand and Body Gestures. 6 Informative Speech Samples. 7 Tips for Your Informative Speech from a Professional.

  5. Informative Speech Outline

    The informative speech is intended to inform the audience about a particular topic. It needs to be well-formatted and properly structured. The informative speaker provides detailed knowledge about the particular topic and lets the audience understand the facts. The general purpose of an informative speech is to educate people about any subject.

  6. PDF Informative Speech & Outline

    Informative Speech. An Informative Speech focus on educating an audience through the use of facts. and evidence to establish credibility. It can include definitions, explanations, descriptions, visual images, demonstrations. It should focus on speaking about. objects, events, processes, concepts, and examples. An informative speech . does. not

  7. 333 Informative Speech Topics To Rock Your Presentation

    Public Speaking 333 Informative Speech Topics To Rock Your Presentation Logan Hailey You have been assigned a speech, presentation, or essay, but you have no clue what to talk about. A powerful presentation begins with a compelling topic that sparks your interest and hooks the audience.

  8. Informative Speech Outline

    There are two ways to outline your speech, and each has its own purpose and advantages: Complete Sentence Format: In this type, the speaker writes full sentences that help you check the content of the speech. 2. Key Point Format: Note down the main points that help you remember what you should include in your speech.

  9. Guide: Planning and Presenting an Informative Speech

    Outlining an Informative Speech. Two types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech. The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech. The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech. In this section, we discuss both types of outlines.

  10. How To Write an Informative Speech in 10 Steps (With Tips)

    Follow these 10 steps to help you write an informative speech: 1. Select your topic. Pick a topic that relates to the goals of your informative speech. Professionals giving informative speeches to their coworkers, for example, might consider different topics than students giving informative speeches as part of a public speaking class. In ...

  11. How to Write an Informative Speech: 14 Steps (with Pictures)

    For others, writing the intro first helps them figure out how to organize the rest of the speech. 3. Present your main ideas in a logically organized body. If you're informing the audience about a process, lay out the steps in the order that they need to be completed.

  12. Informative Speech Outline: Structure and Writing Tips

    How to write an informative speech outline. The primary purpose of developing an outline is to arrange and shape the information methodically. To create an impeccable informative speech outline, follow our template and take the next steps. Step 1. Select an original topic. Opt for unique and innovative subjects to make a captivating presentation.

  13. PDF Understanding Mental Health: Breaking the Stigma

    Home > Blog > Informative Speech > Informative Speech Outline Understanding Mental Health: Breaking the Stigma I. Introduction A. Start with a compelling statistic: "Did you know that approximately 1 in 5 adults in the United States experiences mental illness in a given year? That's a significant portion of our population."

  14. 89 Medical Speech Topic Ideas [Persuasive, Informative, Nursing]

    Medical speech topic list with public speaking ideas for an informative or persuasive medical text such as speech recognition software, Staphylococcus aureus or self-esteem problems. I have these informative ideas for a public speaking speech in mind for you: In this article: Informative Persuasive Nursing Informative

  15. How to Write an Informative Speech Outline: A Step-by-Step Guide

    First of all, make sure your speech follows a logical flow by using signposting, outlining the main ideas at the beginning of the speech and then bulleting out your supporting points. Additionally, you can use transitions throughout the speech to create a smooth order for your thoughts, such as 'next' and 'finally'.

  16. How to Write an Informative Speech (With Outline and Examples)

    As you can see, knowing that you want to inform your audience is just a small part of your speech. To make your speech as effective as possible, write with the right type of speech in mind. 1. Choose Your Topic. Before starting your informative speech outline example, you need to know what you're writing about.

  17. Informative Speeches

    The most common types of informative speeches are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration. A definition speech explains a concept, theory, or philosophy about which the audience knows little. The purpose of the speech is to inform the audience so they understand the main aspects of the subject matter.

  18. 200+ Best Persuasive & Informative Speech Topics about Health

    The benefits of walking without shoes. How smoking is harmful to your health. The benefits of being an organ donor. The dangers of texting while driving. The importance of vitamins and minerals. The nutritional value of pickles. The importance of wearing your seatbelt. The effects of caffeine on the body.

  19. PDF Clinical Depression Specific purpose statement: Central idea: Introduction

    Informative Speech Fall 2014 Clinical Depression Specific purpose statement: To inform the audience about clinical depression Central idea: To inform the audience about the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments of clinical depression. Introduction Have you ever had a best friend? Someone who called your sibling. You talked and hung out

  20. Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate

    Out of these three types, dark chocolate has the highest level of cocoa and the lowest levels of milk and cocoa butter. Hence, it is the most useful to consume and not worry about excessive weight. Cardiovascular benefits of dark chocolate include elevated platelet aggregation, improved blood pressure, and enhanced endothelial function (Kerimi ...

  21. How to Structure Informative Speech

    Start the informative speech by explaining why and how the topic is relevant to the audience. To craft a valuable explanation, talk about the significance of the topic to the individuals, specific groups, and society at large. Also, relate the topic to the audience's interests, experiences, industry, and concerns.

  22. Informative Speech On Health

    Informative Speech On Health. Paula Steib is an insurance advisor from Twenty-nine Palms. She visited Copper Mountain College on September 20th to present a forty minute lecture on health insurance and end of life planning. After drawing a diagram on the whiteboard, she outlined what she planned on talking about in chronological order.

  23. 50+ Medical Topics for Informative Speech 2023

    Medical Informative Speech Topics. 1. The benefits of ozone therapy. 2. The importance of organ donation. 3. The principles of medical ethics. 4. Tip for making up a first aid kit for wilderness expeditions.

  24. Medicare Program; Calendar Year (CY) 2024 Home Health (HH) Prospective

    A comment letter received by NAHC on the CY 2023 proposed rule also attempted to outline, how historically, rate cuts to Medicare home health services alter how HHAs provide care. Compellingly, we also received a significant number of comments in response to the CY 2024 HH PPS proposed rule supporting this concept. These comments are discussed ...